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Of iyompiLaiion 

CONTAINING THE 

LECTURES 01 FAITH 



with added references on the Godhead and the Holy Ghost 



also 



AH HISTOftlCflL SKETCH Of TH€ SfifTlt 

by Dr. John A. Widtsoe 
also a treatise on 

TRUE ffllTH 

by Orson Pratt 



also a 



BIBLIOGRflPHy 0(1 IIIELCHIZEDEK 

by Ariel L. Crowley 



N. B. LUNDWALL 

COMPILER 
•P. O. Box 2033 
SALT UAKE CITY, UTAH 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Historical Sketch of the Lectures on Faith 3 

Lecture First « 7 

Lecture Second ...~ 13 

Lecture Third 33 

Lecture Fourth 41 

Lecture Fifth 48 

Added References on the Godhead and the Holy Ghost.... 53 

Lecture Sixth 57 

Lecture Seventh 61 

True Faith, by Orson Pratt 70 

Shem was Melchizedek 93 

The Faith of Melchizedek 93 

Bibliography from Melchizedek 94 

Added Excerpts on the Godhead 40, 47, 53-56, 60, 69 



THE LIBRARY 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE 
LECTURES ON FAITH 

By Dr. John A. Widtsoe 

"In a revelation given December 27, 1832, the Lord com- 
manded the establishment of a School of the Prophets for 
the instruction of the Saints. (See Section 88:127, 136-141; 
also 90:7.) The school was organized at Kirtland, Ohio, in 
February, 1833, and was continued until April. In this 
school the Elders of the Church "had many glorious seasons 
of refreshing and great joy and satisfaction beamed in the 
countenances of the School of the Prophets, and the Saints, 
on account of the things revealed and our progress of the 
knowledge of God." (History of the Church, Vol. I, pp. 322 
and 334.) 

"So well was the work done in the School at Indepen- 
dence that the Lord made especial mention of it, in one of 
the revelations given at about this time." (Read Section 
97:3-6). 

"The expulsion of the Saints from Missouri in the fall 
of 1833, and the consequent labors, appeared to prevent the 
continuation of the school in Kirtland during the winter of 
1833-34. In November, 1834, however, preparations were 
made for the reopening of the school. The Prophet wrote : 

" 'It now being the last of the month, and the Elders 
beginning to come in, it was necessary to make preparations 
for the school for the Elders, wherein they might be more 
perfectly instructed in the great things of God, during the 
coming winter. A building for a printing office was nearly 
finished, and the lower story of this building was set apart 
for that purpose, (the school,) when it was completed. So 
the Lord opened the way according to our faith and works, 
and blessed be His name/ " (History of the Church, Vol. 
2, pp. 169-70). 

"On December 1, 1834, the Prophet further said: 'Our 
school for the Elders was now well attended, and with the 
lectures on theology, which were regularly delivered, ab- 
sorbed for the time being everything else of a temporal na- 
ture. The cUsses, being mostly Elders, gave the most studi- 



4 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE LECTURES ON FAITH 

ous attention to the all-important object of qualifying- them- 
selves as messengers of Jesus Christ, to be ready to do His 
will in carrying glad tidings to all that would open their ears, 
eyes and hearts/ " (History of the Church, Vol. 2, pp. 175-6). 

During February, 1835, the school was closed for the 
season. . . . 

"It was during the season of the school of the Prophets, 
held at Kirtland, Ohio, during the winter of 1834-35, that a 
series of lectures on theology was prepared, which were 
subsequently revised and printed in the Doctrine and Cove- 
nants, under the title, Lectures on Faith. The Prophet 
makes this clear in his autobiography: 'During the month 
of January, I was engaged iii the school of the Elders, and 
in preparing the lectures on theology for publication in the 
Book of Doctrine and Covenants, which the committee ap- 
pointed last September were now compiling.' (History of the 
Church, Vol. 2, p. 180.) Evidence to the same effect is found 
in the Messenger and Advocate, a monthly paper published 
in Kirtland, Ohio. The reference reads as follows : 

" 'The following are two short lectures which were 
delivered before a Theological class, in this place last winter. 
These lectures are being compiled and arranged with other 
documents of instruction and regulation for the Church, 
entitled "Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of the Lat- 
ter-day Saints," etc. It may be well, for the information of 
churches abroad, to say, that this book will contain the 
important revelations on doctrine and church government, 
now extant, and will, we trust, give them a perfect under- 
standing of the doctrine believed by this society. Such a 
work has long been called for, and if we are prospered a 
few weeks, soon shall have this volume ready for distribu- 
tion. A full detail of its contents will be given hereafter. 

" Tn giving the following lectures we have thought 
best to insert the catechism, that the reader may fully 
understand the manner in which this science is taught. It 
was found that by annexing a catechism to the lectures as 
they were presented, the class made greater progress than 
otherwise; and in consequence of the additional scripture 
proofs, it was preserved in compiling/ 5 (Messenger and 
Advocate, May, 1835, p. 122.) 

"The rank of the Lectures on Faith or their value in 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE LECTURES ON FAITH 5 

comparison with the revelations found in the Doctrine and 
Covenants may be understood from the following statement 
taken from the authorized History of the Church: 'These 
lectures on faith here referred to, were afterwards prepared 
by the Prophet, and published in the Doctrine and Cove- 
nants under the title "Lectures on Faith." They are seven in 
number, and occupy the first seventy-five pages in the 
current editions of the Doctrine and Covenants. They are 
not to be regarded as of equal authority in matters of doc- 
trine with the revelations of God in the Doctrine and Cove- 
nants, but as stated by Elder John Smith, who when the 
Book of Doctrine and Covenants was submitted to the 
several quorums of Priesthood for acceptance, (August 17, 
1835) speaking in behalf of the Kirtland High Council, bore 
record 'that the revelations in said book were true, and that 
the lectures were judiciously written and compiled, and 
were profitable doctrine.' The distinction which Elder John 
Smith here makes should be observed as marking the difference 
between the Lectures on Faith and the revelations of God in the 
Doctrine and Covenants." (History of the Church, Vol. 
2, p. 176, footnotes.) 

"In the summer and autumn of 1833, a somewhat similar 
school was conducted at Independence, Jackson County, 
Missouri. Elder Parley P. Pratt who was the teacher, gives 
the following account of this school : 

" 'In the latter part of summer and in the autumn, I 
devoted almost my entire time in ministering among the 
churches; holding meetings; visiting the sick; comforting 
the afflicted, and giving counsel. A school of Elders was 
also organized, over which I was called to preside. This 
class, to the number of about sixty, met for instruction 
once a week. The place of meeting was in the open air, under 
some tall trees in a retired place in the wilderness, where we 
prayed, preached and prophesied, and exercised ourselves 
in the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Here great blessings were 
poured out, and many great and marvelous things were 
manifested and taught. The Lord gave me great wisdom and 
enabled me to teach and edify the Elders, and comfort and 
encourage them in their preparations for the great work 
which lay before us. I was also much edified and strength- 
ened. To attend this school I had to travel on foot, and 



6 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE LECTURES ON FAITH 

sometimes with bare feet at that, about six miles. This I 

did once a week, besides visiting and preaching in five or 

six branches a week.' *' (Autobiography of P. P. Pratt, 
pp. 99-100.) 

(Note : The above is copied from the M. I. A. Manual 
for the year 1906-1907, Subject: Modern Revelation, pp. 
32-34.) 

The Lectures on Faith have not been printed in the 
current editions of the Doctrine and Covenants, because 
they are not revelations to the Church. 

The preceding paragraphs will be instructive and en- 
lightening to all, as it will give the information as to how 
and when these Lectures on Faith were brought forth, as 
well as their authenticity. The occasion for the printing of 
these Lectures on Faith at this time is because of a demand 
for the wonderful information that they contain. -Surely, 
the printing of these Lectures will be the means of an in- 
crease of faith among all who read them. 




LECTURES ON FAITH 

LECTURE FIRST 

On the Doctrine of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- 
day Saints, originally delivered before a Class of the Elders, in 
Kirtland, Ohio. 

1. Faith being the first principle in revealed religion, and 
the foundation of all righteousness, necessarily claims the first 
place in a course of lectures whifch are designed to unfold to the 
understanding the doctrine of Jesus Christ. 

2. In presenting the subject of faith, we shall observe the 
following order — 

3. First, faith itself — what it is. 

4. Secondly, the object on which it rests. And, 

5. Thirdly, the effects which flow from it. 

6. Agreeable to this order we have first to show what faith 
is. 

7. The author of the epistle to the Hebrews, in the eleventh 
chapter of that epistle and first verse, gives the following defini- 
tion of the word faith : 

8. "Now faith is the substance (assurance) of things hoped 
for, the evidence of things not seen." 

9. From this we learn that faith is the assurance which men 
have of the existence of things which they have not seen, and the 
principle of action in all intelligent beings. 

10. If men were duly to consid'er themselves, and turn 
their thoughts and reflections to the operations of their own 
minds, they would readily discover that it is faith, and faith only, 
which is the moving cause of all action in them; that without 
it both mind and body would be in a state of inactivity, and all 
their exertions would cease, both physical and mental. 

11. Were this class to go back and reflect upon the history of 
their lives, from the period of their first recollection, and ask 
themselves what principle excited them to action, or what gave 
them energy and activity in all their lawful avocations, callings, 
and pursuits, what would be the answer ? Would it not be that it 
was the assurance which they had of the existence of things 
which they had not seen as yet ? Was it not the hope which you 
had, in consequence of your belief in the existence of unseen 



8 LECTURES ON FAITH 

things, which stimulated you to action and exertion in order to 
obtain them? Are you not dependent on your faith, or belief, 
for the acquisition of all knowledge, wisdom, and intelligence? 
Would you exert yourselves to obtain wisdom and intelligence, 
unless you did believe that you could obtain them ? Would you 
have ever sown, if you had not believed that you would reap? 
Would you have ever planted, if you had not believed that you 
would gather? Would you have ever asked, unless you had 
believed that you would receive? Would you have ever sought, 
unless you had believed that you would have found? Or, would 



you have ever knocked, unle^g you had believed that it would 

C have been opened unto yo uj/ln a word, is there anything that 
| j ^you"W"oiild have aoney eitKer physical or mental, if you had not 
) previously believed? Are not all your exertions of every kind, 
dependent on your faith ? Or, may we not ask, what have you, 
or what do you possess, which you have not obtained by reason 
of your faith? Your food, your raiment, your lodgings, are 
they not all by reason of your faith? Reflect, and ask yourselves 
if these things are not so. Turn your thoughts on your own 
minds, and see if faith is not the moving cause of all action 
in yourselves; and, if the -moving cause in you, isjt not in all 
Qther jntelligent b eings ? m _.. 

12. And as faith is the moving cause of all action in tem - 
poral concerns, so it "is~in spiritual; f or the Saviour has said, 
and that truly, that "He that believeth and is bapized, shall be 
saved." Mark xvi. 16. 

13. As we receive by faith all temporal blessings that we 
do receive, so we in like manner receive by faith all spiritual 
blessings that we do receive. But faith is not only the principle 
of action, but of power also, in all intelligent beings, whether 
in heaven or on earth. Thus says the author of the epistle to the 
Hebrews, xi. 3 — 

14. "Through faith we understand that the worlds were 
framed by the word of God ; so that things which are seen were 
not made of things which do appear." 

15. By this we understand that the principle of power 
which existed in the bosom of God, by which the worlds were 
framed, was faith ; and that it is by reason of this principle of 
power existing in the Deity, that all created things exist ; so that 
all things in heaven, on earth, or under the earth exist by reason 
of faith as it existed in Him. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 9 

16. Had it not been for the principle of faith the worlds 
would never have been framed neither would man have been 
formed of the dust. It is the principle by which Jehovah works, 
and through which he exercises power over all temporal as well 
as eternal things. Take this principle or attribute — for it is an 
attribute — from the Deity, and he would cease to exist. 

17. Who cannot see, that if God framed the worlds by 
faith, that it is by faith that he exercises power over them, and • 
that faith is the principle of power? And if the principle of pow- 
er, it must be. so in man as well as in the Deity? This is the 
testimony of all the sacred writers, and the lesson which they 
have been endeavouring to teach to man. 

18. The Saviour says (Matthew xvii. 19, 20), in explaining 
the reason why the disciples could not cast out the devil, that it 
was because of their unbelief — "For verily I say unto you" 
(said he), "if ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall 
say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place,' and it 
shall remove ; and nothing shall be impossible unto you." 

19. Moroni, while abridging and compiling the record of his 
fathers, has given us the following account of faith as the princi- 
ple of power. He says, page 597, that it was the faith of Alma 
and Amulek which caused the walls of the prison to be rent, as 
recorded on the 278th page ; it was the faith of Nephi and Lehi 
which caused a change to be wrought upon the hearts of the 
Lamanites, when they were immersed with the Holy "Spirit and 
with fire, as seen on the 443rd page ; and that it was by faith 
the mountain Zerin was removed when the brother of Jared 
spake in the name of the Lord. See also 599th page. 

20. In addition to this we are told in Hebrews xi. 32, 33, 
34, 35, that Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, David, Samuel, 
and the prophets, through faith subdued Kingdoms, wrought 
righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions, 
quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword ; out 
of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned 
to flight the armies of the aliens, and that women received 
their dead raised to life again, &c, &c. 

21. Also Joshua, in the sight of all Israel, bade the sun and 
moon to stand still, and it was done. Joshua x: 12. 

22. We here understand, that the sacred writers say that all 
these things were done by faith. It was by faith that the worlds 
were framed. God spake, chaos heard, and worlds came into 



10 LECTURES ON FAITH 

order by reason of the faith there was in Him. So with man 
also ; he spake by faith in the name of God, and the sun stood 
still, the moon obeyed, mountains removed, prisons fell, lions' 
mouths were closed, the human heart lost its enmity, fire its 
violence, armies their power, the sword its terror, and death its 
dominion ; and all this by reason of the faith which was in him. 

23. Had it not been for the faith which was in men, they 
might have spoken to the sun, the moon, the mountains, prisons, 
the human heart, fire, armies, the sword, or to death in vain ! 

24. Faith, then, is the first great governing principle which 
\, has power, dominion, and authority over all things; by it 

jC they exist, by it they are upheld, by it they are changed, or by 
it they remain, agreeable to the will of God. Without it there is 
no power, and with out power there could be no creation nor 
existence ! 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON THE FOREGOING PRINCIPLES 

What is theology? It is that revealed science which treats 
of the being and attributes of God, his relations to us, the dis- 
pensations of his providence, his will with respect to our actions, 
and his purposes with respect to our end. Buck's Theological 
Dictionary, page 582. 

What is the first principle in this revealed science ? Faith. 
Lecture i. 1. 

• Why is faith the first principle in this revealed science? 
Because it is the foundation of all righteousness. 
Hebrews xi. 6: "Without faith it is impossible to please God." 
1 John iii. 7 : "Little children, let no man deceive you ; he that 
doeth righteousness, is righteous, even as he (God) is righteous." 
Lecture i. 1. 

What arrangement should be followed in presenting the 
subject of faith? First, it should be shown what faith is. Lec- 
ture i. 3. Secondly, the object upon which it rests. Lecture i. 4. 
And, thirdly, the effects which flow from it. Lecture i. 5. 

What is faith ? It is the assurance of things hoped for, the 
evidence of things not seen (Hebrews xi. 1) ; that is, it is the 
assurance we have of the existence of unseen things. And being 
the assurance which we have of the existence of unseen things, 
must be the principle of action in all intelligent beings. Hebrews 
xi. 3: "Through faith we understand the worlds were framed 
by the word of God." Lecture i. 8, 9. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 11 

How do you prove that faith is the principle of action in 
all intelligent beings ? First, by duly considering the operations 
of my own mind; and, secondly, by the direct declaration of 
Scripture. Hebrews xi. 7: "By faith Noah, being warned of 
things not seen as yet, moved with fear, prepared an ark to the 
saving of his house, by the which he condemned the world, and 
became heir of the righteousness which is by faith. " Hebrews 
xi. 8: "By faith Abraham, when he was called to go into a place 
which he should afterwards receive for an inheritance, obeyed, 
and he went out not knowing whither he went." Hebrews xi. 9: 
"By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, as in a strange 
country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs 
with him of the same promise. " Hebrews xi. 27: By faith 
Moses "forsook Egypt, not fearing the wrath of the king, for he 
endured as seeing him who is invisible." Lecture i. 10, 11. 

Is not faith the principle of action in spiritual things as well 
as in temporal ? It is. 

How do you prove it? Hebrews xi. 6: "Without faith it is 
impossible to please God." Mark xvi. 16: "He that believeth 
and is baptized shall be saved." Romans iv. 16: "Therefore it 
is of faith that it might be by grace; to the end the promise 
might be sure to all the seed ; not to that only which is of the 
law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is 
the father of us all." Lecture i. 12, 13. 

Is faith anything else beside the principle of action? It is. 

What is it? It is the principle of power also. Lecture i. 13. 

How do you prove it? First, it is the principle of power 
in the Deity as well as in man. Hebrews xi. 3 : "Through faith 
we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, 
so that things which are seen were not made of things which 
do appear." Lecture i. 14, 15, 16. Secondly, it is the principle 
of power in man also. Book of Mormon, page 278. Alma and 
Amulek are delivered from prison. Ibid, page 443. Nephi and 
Lehi, with the Lamanites, are immersed with the Spirit. Ibid, 
page 599. The mountain Zerin, by the faith of the brother of 
Jared, is removed. Joshua x. 12: "Then spake Joshua to the 
Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites be- 
fore the children of Israel, and he said, in the sight of Israel, 
'Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon, and thou moon in the valley 
of Ajalon.' " Joshua x. 13: "And the sun stood still, and the 
moon stayed, until the people had avenged themselves of their 



12 LECTURES ON FAITH 

enemies Is not this written in the book of Jasher? So the sun 
stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down 
.about a whole day." Matthgw xvii.LQ; "Then came the disciples 
to Jesus apart, and said, 'Why could not we cast him out?' " 
Matthew xvii. 20: "And Jesus said unto them, Because of your 
unbelief; for verily I say unto you, if ye have faith as a grain 
ot mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, 'Remove hence 
to yonder place,' and it shall remove ; and, nothing shall be im- 
possible unto you." Hebrews xi. 32 and the following verses: 
And what shall I say more ? for the time would fail me to tell 
ot Gideon, and of Barak, and of Samson, and of Jephthah, of 
uavid also, and Samuel, and of the prophets, who through faith 
subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, 
stopped the mouths of lions, quenched the violence of fire es- 
caped the edge of the sword ; out of weakness were made strong 
waxed valient in fight, turned to fight the armies of the aliens! 
Women received their dead raised to life again, and others 
were tortured, not accepting deliverance, that they might obtain 
a better resurrection." Lecture i 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21* 22. 

How would you define faith in its most unlimited sense? 
it is the hrst great governing principle which has power, domin- 
ion, and authority over all things. Lecture i. 24. 
f . , How ,do you convey to the understanding more clearly that 
taith is the first great governing principle which has power, 
dominion, and authority over all things? By it they exist, by it 
they are upheld, by it they are changed, or by it they remain, 
agreeable to the will of God; and without it there is no power 
and without power there could be no creation nor existence! 
Lecture i. 24. 



LECTURE SECOND 

1. Having shown in our previous lecture "faith itself — 
what it is," we shall proceed to show, secondly, the object on 
which it rests. 

2. We here observe that God is the only supreme governor 
and independent being in whom all fullness and perfection 
dwell ; who is omnipotent, omnipresent and omniscient ; without 
beginning of days or end of life ; and that in him every good 
gift and every good principle dwell ; and that he is the Father of 
lights ; in him the principle of faith dwells independently, and 
he is the object in whom the faith of all other rational and ac- 
countable beings center for life and salvation. 

3. In order to present this part of the subject in a clear and 
conspicuous point of light, it is necessary to go back and show 
the evidences which mankind have had, and the foundation on 
which these evidences are, or were, based since the creation, to 
believe in the existence of a God. 

4. We do not mean those evidences which are manifested 
by the works of creation which we daily behold with our natural 
eyes. We are sensible that, after a revelation of Jesus Christ, the 
works of creation, throughout their vast forms and varieties, 
clearly exhibit his eternal power and Godhead. Romans i. 20: 
"For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world 
are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, 
even his eternal power and Godhead ;" but we mean those evi- 
dences by which the first thoughts were suggested to the minds 
of men that there was a God who created all things. 

5. We shall now proceed to examine the situation of man 
at his first creation. Moses, the historian, has given us the follow- 
ing account of him in the first chapter of the book of Genesis, 
beginning with the 20th verse, and closing with the 30th. We 
copy from the new translation : 

6. "And I, God, said unto mine Only Begotten, which was 
with me from the beginning, 'Let us make man in our image, 
after our likeness ;' and it was so. 

7. "And I, God, said, 'Let them have dominion over the 
fishes of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the 
cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that 
creepeth upon the earth/ 



14 LECTURES ON FAITH 

8. "And I, God, created man in mine own image, in the 
image of mine Only Begotten created I him ; male and female 
created I them. And I, God, blessed them, and said unto them, 
'Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it ; 
and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl 
of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the 
earth.' 

9. "And I, God, said unto man, 'Behold, I have given you 
every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, 
and every tree in the which shall be the fruit of a tree yielding 
seed ; to you it shall be for meat.' " 

10. Again, Genesis ii. 15, 16, 17, 19, 20: "And I, the Lord 
God, took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden, to 
dress it and to keep it. And I, the Lord God, commanded the 
man saying, 'Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat; 
but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not 
eat of it ; nevertheless thou mayest choose for thyself, for it is 
given unto thee ; but remember that I forbid it, for in the day 
thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die/ 

11. "And out of the ground I, the Lord God, formed every 
beast of the field, and every fowl of the air, and commanded 
that they should come unto Adam, to see what he would call 
them. * * * And whatsoever Adam called every living creature, 
that should be the name thereof. And Adam gave names to all 
cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field/' 

12. From the foregoing we learn man's situation at his 
first creation, the knowledge with which he was endowed, and 
the high and exalted station in which he was placed — lord or 
governor of all things bn earth, and at the same time enjoying 
communion and intercourse with his Maker, without a vail to 
separate between. We shall next proceed to examine the account 
given of his fall, and of his being driven out of the garden of 
Eden, and from the presence of the Lord. 

13. Moses proceeds — " And they" (Adam and Eve) "heard 
the voice of the Lord God, as they were walking in the garden, 
in the cool of the day ; and Adam and his wife went to hide them- 
selves from the presence of the Lord God amongst the trees of 
the garden. And I, the Lord God, called unto Adam, and said 
unto him, 'Where goest thou ?' And he said, 'I heard thy, voice 
in the garden, and I was afraid, because I beheld that I was 
naked, and I hid myself.' 



LECTURES ON FAITH 15 

14. "And I, the Lord God, said unto Adam, 'Who told thee 
thou wast naked ? Hast thou eaten of the tree whereof I com- 
manded thee that thou shouldst not eat? If -so, thou shouldst 
surelv die ?' And the man said, 'The woman whom thou gavest 
me, and commandedst that she should remain with me, gave me 
of the fruit of the tree, and I did eat/ 

15. "And I, the Lord God, said unto the woman, 'What is 
this thing which thou hast done?' And the woman said, 'The 
serpent beguiled me, and I did eat.' 

16. And again, the Lord said unto the woman, " 'I will 
greatly multiply thy sorrow, and thy conception. In sorrow thou 
shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy hus- 
band, and he shall rule over thee. 

17. "And unto Adam, I, the Lord God, said, 'Because thou 
hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the 
fruit of the tree of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt 
not eat of it ! cursed shall be the ground for thy sake ; in sorrow 
thou shalt eat of it all the days of thy life. Thorns also, and 
thistles shall it bring forth to thee, and thou shalt eat the herb 
of the field. By the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, uptil 
thou shalt return unto the ground — for thou shalt surely die — 
for out of it wast thou taken : for dust thou wast, and unto dust 
shalt thou return/ " This was immediately followed by the 
fulfillment of what we previously said — Man was driven or sent 
out of Eden. 

18. Two important items are shown from the former quota- 
tions. First, after man was created, he was not left without in- 
telligence or understanding, to wander in darkness and spend 
an existence in ignorance and doubt (on the great and important 
point which effected his happiness) as to the real fact by whom 
he was created, or unto whom he was amenable for his conduct. 

-^God conversed with him face to face. In his presence he was 
^permitted to stand, and from his own mouth he was permitted 
to receive instruction. He heard his voice, walked before him 
and gazed upon his glory, while intelligence burst upon his under- 
standing, and enabled him to give names to the vast assemblage 
of his Maker's works. 

19. Secondly, we have seen, that though man did trans- 
gress, his transgression did not deprive him of the previous 
knowledge with which he was endowed relative to the existence 



16 LECTURES ON FAITH 

and glory of his Creator; for no sooner did he hear his voice 
than he sought to hide himself from his presence. 

20. Having shown, then, in the first instance, that God 
began to converse with man immediately after he "breathed into 
his nostrils the breath of life," and that he did not cease to mani- 
fest himself to him, even after his fall, we shall next proceed 
to show, that though he was cast out from the garden of Eden, 
his knowledge of the existence of God was not lost, neither did 
God cease to manifest his will unto him. 

21. We next proceed to present the account of the direct 
revelation which man received after he was cast out of Eden, 
and further copy from the new translation — 

22. After Adam had been driven out of the garden, he 
"began to till the earth, and to have dominion over all the beasts 
of the field, and to eat his bread by the sweat of his brow, as I 
the Lord had commanded him." And he called upon the name of 
the Lord, and so did Eve, his wife, also. "An they heard the 
voice of the Lord, from the way toward the garden of Eden, 
speaking unto them, and they saw him not, for they were shut 
out from his presence ; and he gave unto them commandments 
that they should worship the Lord their God, and should offer 
the firstlings of their flocks for an offering unto the Lord. And 
Adam was obedient unto the commandments of the Lord. 

23. "And after many days an angel of the Lord appeared 
unto Adam, saying, 'Why dost thou offer sacrifices unto the 
Lord?' And Adam said unto him, 'I know not; save the Lord 
commanded me.' 

24. "And then the angel spake, saying 'This thing is a 
similitude of the sacrifice of the Only Begotten of the Father, 
who is full of grace and truth. And thou shalt do all that thou 
doest in the name of the Son, and thou shalt repent and call upon 
God in the name of the Son for evermore.' And in that day the 
Holy Ghost fell upon Adam, which beareth record of the Father 
and the Son." 

25. This last quotation, or summary, shows this important 
fact, that though our first parents were driven out of the garden 
of Eden, and were even separated from the presence of God by 
a vail, they still retained a knowledge of his existence, and that 
sufficiently to move them to call upon him. And further, that 
no sooner was the plan of redemption revealed to man, and he 



LECTURES ON FAITH 17 

began to call upon God, than the Holy Spirit was given, bearing 
record of the Father and Son. 

26. Moses also gives us an account, in the fourth of Genesis, 
of the transgression of Cain, and the righteousness of Abel, and 
of the revelations of God to them. He says, "In process of 
time, Cain brought of the fruit of the ground an offering unto 
the Lord. And Abel also brought of the firstlings of his flock, 
and of the fat thereof. And the Lord had respect unto Abel, 
and to his offering; but unto Cain and to his offering he had 
not respect. Now Satan knew this, and it pleased him. And 
Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. And the Lord 
said unto Cain, 'Why art thou wroth ? Why is thy countenance 
fallen? If thou doest well, thou shalt be accepted. And if thou 
doest not well, sin lieth at the door, and Satan desireth to have 
thee ; and except thou shalt hearken unto my commandments, I 
will deliver thee up, and it shall be unto thee according to his 
desire.' 

27. "And Cain went into the field, and Cain talked with 
Abel, his brother. And it came to pass that while they were in 
the field, Cain rose up against Abel, his brother, and slew him. 
And Cain gloried in that, which he had done, saying, 'I am free ; 
surely the flocks of my brother falleth unto my hands.' 

28. "But the Lord said unto Cain, 'Where is Abel, thy 
brother?' And he said, 'I know not. Am I my brother's keeper?' 
And the Lord said, 'What hast thou done? the voice of thy 
brother's blood cries unto me from the ground. And now, thou 
shalt be cursed from the earth which hath opened her mouth 
to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand. When thou tillest 
the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength. 
A fugitive and a vagabond shalt thou be in the earth.' 

29. "And Cain said unto the Lord, 'Satan tempted me be- 
cause of my brother's flocks. And I was wroth also ; for his 
offering thou didst accept and not mine; my punishment is 
greater than I can bear. Behold thou hast driven me out this 
day from the face of the Lord, and from thy face shall I be 
hid ; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth ; and 
it shall come to pass that he that findeth me will slay me because 
of mine iniquities, for these things are not hid from the Lord.' 
And the Lord said unto him, 'Whosoever slayeth thee, vengeance 
shall be taken on him sevenfold.' And I the Lord set a mark 
upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him." 




LECTURES ON FAITH 

30 \ The object of the foregoing quotations i> tn show to 
t his classj tne way by which mankind were first made acquainted 
existence of a God ; that it was by a manifestation of 
God to man, and that God continued, after man's transgression, 
to manifest himself to him and to his posterity ; and, notwith- 
standing they were separated from his immediate presence 
that they could not see his face, they continued to hearjiis voice,, 

31. Adam, thus being made acquainted with God, communi- 
cated the knowledge which he had unto his posterity ; and it was 
through this means that the thought was first suggested to their 
minds^that there .jyasL a JGocL which laid the foundation for the 
exercise of their faith, through which they could obtain a know- 
ledge of his character and also of his glory. 

32. Not only was there a manifestation made unto Adam 
of the existence of a God; but Moses informs us, as before 
quoted, that God condescended to talk with Cain after his great 
transgression in slaying his brother, and that Cain knew that 
it was the Lord that was talking with him, so that when he was 
driven out from the presence of his brethren, he carried with him 
the knowledge of the existence of a God; and, through this 
means, doubtless, his posterity became acquainted with the fact 
that such a Being existed. 

33. From this we can see that the whole human family in 
the eatly age of their existence, in all their different branches, 
had this knowledge disseminated among them ; so that the exis- 
tence of God became an object of faith in the early age of the 
world. And the evidences which these men had of the existence 
of a God^w^jthe testimony of their fathers in the first instance. 

"34. The reason why we have been thus particular on this 
part of our subject, is that this class may see by what means it 
was that God became an object of faith among men after the 
fall ; and what it was that stirred up the faith of multitudes to 
feel after him — to search after a knowledge of his character, 
perfections and attributes, until they became extensively ac- 
quainted with him, and not only commune with him and behold 
his glory, but be partakers of his power and stand in his presence. 
35. Let this class mark particularly, that the testimony 
which these men had of the existence of a God, was the testimony 
of man ; for previous to the time that any of Adam's posterity 
had obtained a manifestation of God to themselves, Adam, their 



LECTURES ON FAITH 19 

common father, had testified unto them of the existence of God, 
and of his eternal power and Godhead. 

36. For instance, Abel, before he received the assurance 
from heaven that his offerings were acceptable unto God, had 
received the important information of his father that such a 
Being did exist, who had created and who did uphold all things. 
Neither can there be a doubt existing on the mind of any person, 
that Adam was the first who did communicate the knowledge of 
the existence of a God to his posterity ; and that the whole faith 
of the world, from that time down to the present, is in a certain 
degree dependent on the knowledge first communicated to them 
by their common progenitor; and it has been handed down to 
the day and generation in which we live, as we shall show from 
the face of the sacred records. 

37. First, Adam was 130 years old when Seth was born. 
Genesis v. 3. And the days of Adam, after he had begotten Seth, 
were 800 years, making him 930 years old when he died. Genesis 
v. 4, 5. Seth was 105 when Enos was born (verse 6) ; Enos was 
90 when Cainan was born (verse 9) ; Cainan was 70 when Maha- 
laleel was born (verse 12) ; Mahalaleel was 65 when Jared was 
born (verse 15) ; Jared was 162 when Enoch was born (verse 
18) ; Enoch was 65 when Methuselah was born (verse 21) ; 
Methuselah was 187 when Lamech was born (verse 25) ; 
Lamech was 182 when Noah was born (verse 28). 

38. From this account it appears that Lamech, the 9th 
from Adam, and the father of Noah, was 56 years old when 
Adam died; Methuselah, 243, Enoch, 308; Jared, 470; Mahala- 
leel, 535 ; Cainan, 605 ; Enos, 695 ; and Seth, 800. 

39. So that Lamech the father of Noah, Methuselah, Enoch, 
Jared, Mahalaleel, Cainan, Enos, Seth, and Adam, were all 
living at the same time, and beyond all controversy, were all 
preachers of righteousness. 

40. Moses further informs us that Seth lived after he begat 
Enos, 807 years, making him 912 years old at his death. Genesis 
v. 7, 8. And Enos lived after he begat Cainan, 815 years, making 
him 905 years old when he died (verses 10, 11). And Cainan 
lived after he begat Mahalaleel, 840 years, making him 910 years 
old at his death (verses 13, 14). And Mahalaleel lived after 
he begat Jared, 830 years, making 895 years old when he died 
(verses 16, 17). And Jared lived after he begat Enoch, 800 
years, making him 962 years old at his death (verses 19, 20). 



20 LECTURES ON FAITH 

And Enoch walked with God after he begat Methuselah 300 years, 
making him 365 years old when he was translated (verses 22. 
23).* And Methuselah lived after he begat Lamech, 782 years, 
making him 969 years old when he died (verses 26, 27) . Lamech 
lived after he begat Noah, 595 years, making him 777 years old 
when he died (verses 30, 31). 

41. Agreeable to this account, Adam died in the 930th year 
of the world; Enoch was translated in the 987th,* Seth died 
in the 1042nd; Enos in the 1140th; Cainan in the 1235th; Ma- 
halaleel in the 1290th; Jared in the 1422nd; Lamech in the 
1651st; and Methuselah in the 1656th, it being the same year in 
which the flood came. 

42. So that Noah was 84 years old when Enos died, 176 
when Cainan died, 234 when Mahalaleel died, 366 when Jared 
died, 595 when Lamech died, and 600 when Methuselah died. 

43. We can see from this that Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, 
Jared, Methuselah, Lamech, and Noah, all lived on the earth at 
the same time; and that Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, 
Methuselah, and Lamech, were all acquainted with both Adam 
and Noah. 

44. From the foregoing it is easily to be seen, not only how 
the knowledge of God came into the world, but upon what prin- 
ciple it was preserved ; that from the time it was first communi- 
cated, it was retained in the minds of righteous men, who taught 
not only their own posterity but the world ; so that there was no 
need of a new revelation to man, after Adam's creation to 
Noah, to give them the first idea or notion of the existence of a 
God ; and not only of a God, but the true and living God. 

45. Having traced the chronology of the world from Adam 
to Noah, we will now trace it from Noah to Abraham.. Noah was 
502 years old when Shem was born; 98 years afterwards the 
flood came, being the 600th year of Noah's age. And Moses 
informs us that Noah lived after the flood 350 years, making 
him 950 years old when he died. Genesis ix. 28, 29. 

46. Shem was 100 years old when Arphaxad was born. 
Genesis xi. 10. Arphaxad was 35 when Salah was born (xi. 12) : 
Salah was 30 when Eber was born (xi. 14) ; Eber was 34 when 
Peleg was born, in whose days the earth was divided (xi 16) ; 
Peleg was 30 when Reu was born (xi. 18) ; Reu was 32 when 

♦According to the Old Testament. For Enoch's age, see Covenants 
and Commandments, section 107. 49. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 21 

Serug was born (xi. 20) ; Serug was 30 when Nahor was born 
(xi. 22) ; Nahor was 29 when Terah was born (xi. 24) ; Terah 
was 70 when Haran and Abraham were born (xi. 26). 

47. There is some difficulty in the account given by Moses 
of Abraham's birth. Some have supposed that Abraham was not 
born until Terah was 130 years old. This conclusion is drawn 
from a variety of scriptures, which are not to our purpose at 
present to quote. Neither is it a matter of any consequence to 
us whether Abraham was born when Terah was 70 years old, or 
130. But in order that there may no doubt exist upon any mind 
in relation to the object lying immediately before us, in pre- 
senting the present chronology we will date the birth of Abraham 
at the latest period, that is, when Terah was 130 years old. It 
appears from this account that from the flood to the birth of 
Abraham, was 352 years. 

48. Moses informs us that Shem lived after he begat Ar- 
phaxad, 500 years (xi. 11) ; this added to 100 years, which was 
his age when Arphaxad was born, makes him 600 years old when 
he died. Arphaxad lived, after he begat Salah, 403 years (xi. 
13) ; this added to 35 years, which was his age when Salah 
was born, makes him 438 years old when he died. Salah lived 
after he begat Eber, 403 years (xi. 15) ; this added to 30 years, 
which was his age when Eber was born, makes him 433 years 
old when he died. Eber lived after he begat Peleg, 430 years 
(xi. 17) ; this added to 34 years, which was his age when Peleg 
was born, makes him 464 years old. Peleg lived after he begat 
Reu, 209 years (xi. 19) ; this added to 30 years, which was his 
age when Reu was born makes him 239 years old when he died. 
Reu lived after he begat Serug 207 years (xi. 21) ; this added to 
32 years, which was his age when Serug was born, makes him 
239 years old when he died. Serug lived after he begat Nahor, 
200 years (xi. 23) ; this added to 30 years, which was his age 
when Nahor was born, makes him 230 years old when he died. 
Nahor lived after he begat Terah, 119 years (xi. 25) ; this added 
to 29 years, which was his age when Terah was born, makes 
him 148 years when he died. Terah was 130 years old when Abra- 
ham was born, and is supposed to have lived 75 years after his 
birth, making him 205 years old when he died. 

49. Agreeable to this last account, Peleg died in the 1996th 
year of the world, Nahor in the 1997th, and Noah in the 2006th. 
So that Peleg, in whose days the earth was divided, and Nahor, 



22 LECTURES ON FAITH 

the grandfather of Abraham, both died before Noah — the for- 
mer being 239 years old, and the latter 148; and who cannot 
but see that they must have had a long and intimate acquaintance 
with Noah? 

50. Rue died in the 2026th year of the world, Serug in the 
2049th, Terah in the 2083rd, Arphaxad in the 2096th, Salah in 
the 2126th, Shem in the 2158th, Abraham in the 2183rd, and 
Eber in the 2187th, which was four years after Abraham's death. 
And Eber was the fourth from Noah. 

51. Nahor, Abraham's brother, was 58 years old when Noah 
died, Terah 128, Serug 187, Reu 219, Eber 283, Salah 313, 
Arphaxad 344, and Shem 448. 

52. It appears from this account, that Nahor, brother of 
Abraham, Terah, Nahor, Serug, Reu, Peleg, Eber, Salah, Ar- 
phaxad, Shem, and Noah, all lived on the earth at the same 
time; and that Abraham was 18 years old when Reu died, 41 
when Serug and his brother Nahor died, 75 when Terah died, 
88 when Arphaxad died, 118 when Salah died, 150 when Shem 
died, and that Eber lived four years after Abraham's death. 
And that Shem, Arphaxad, Salah, Eber, Reu, Serug, Terah, 
and Nahor, the brother of Abraham, and Abraham, lived at the 
same time. And that Nahor, brother of Abraham, Terah, Serug, 
Reu, Eber, Salah, Arphaxad, and Shem, were all acquainted 
with both Noah and Abraham. 

53. We have now traced the chronology of the world 
agreeable to the account given in our present Bible, from Adam 
to Abraham, and have clearly determined, beyond the power of 
controversy, that there was no difficulty in preserving the know- 
ledge of God in the world from the creation of Adam, and the 
manifestation made to his immediate descendents, as set forth 
in the former part of this lecture ; so that the students in this 
class need not have any doubt resting on their minds on this 
subject, for they can easily see that it is impossible for it to be 
otherwise, but that the knowledge of the existence of a God 
must have continued from father to son, as a matter of tradition 
at least; for we cannot suppose that a knowledge of this im- 
portant fact could have existed in the mind of any of the before- 
mentioned individuals, without their having made it known to 
their posterity. 

54. We have now shown how it was that the first thought 
ever existed in the mind of any individual that there was such 



LECTURES ON FAITH 23 

a Being as a God, who had created and did uphold all things : 
that it was by reason of the manifestation which he first made to 
our father Adam, when he stood in his presence, and conversed 
with him face to face, at the time of his creation. 

55. Let us here observe, that after any portion of the 
human family are made acquainted with the important fact that 
there is a God, who has created and does uphold all things, the 
extent of their knowledge respecting his character and glory 
will depend upon their diligence and faithfulness in seeking 
after him, until, like Enoch, the brother of Jared, and Moses, 
they shall obtain faith in God, and power with him to behold 
him face to face. 

56. We have now clearly set forth how it is, and how it 
was, that God became an object of faith for rational beings; 
and also, upon what foundation the testimony was based which 
excited the inquiry and diligent search of the ancient saints to 
seek after and obtain a knowledge of the glory of God ; and we 
have seen that it was human testimony, and human testimony 
only, that excited this inquiry, in the first instance, in their 
minds. It was the credence they gave to the testimony of their 
fathers, this testimony having aroused their minds to inquire 
after the knowledge of God ; the inquiry frequently terminated, 
indeed always termina ted when rightly pursued, in the most 
gloriou s discoveries an5~eternal certainty. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON THE FOREGOING PRINCIPLES 

Is there a being who has faith in himself, independently? 
There is. 

Who is it? It is God. 

How do you prove that God has faith in himself indepen- 
dently ? Because he is omnipotent, omnipresent, and omniscient ; 
without beginning of days or end of life, and in him all fullness 
dwells. Ephesians i. 23 : "Which is his body, the fullness of him 
that filleth all in all." Colossians i. 19: "For it pleased the Father 
that in him should all fullness dwell." Lecture ii. 2. 

Is he the object in whom the faith of all other rational and 
accountable beings center, for life and salvation? He is. 

How do you prove it ? Isaiah xlv. 22 : "Look unto me and be 
ye saved, all the ends of the earth ; for I am God, and there is 
none else." Romans xi. 34, 35, 36 : "For who hath known the 
mind of the Lord; or who hath been his counselor? or who 



24 LECTURES ON FAITH 

hath first given to him, and it shall be recompensed unto him 
again ? For of him, and through him, and to him, are all things, 
to whom be glory for ever. Amen/' Isaiah xl., from the 9th 
to the 18th verses: "O Zion, that bringest good tidings; (or, 
O thou that tellest good tidings to Zion) get thee up into the 
high mountain; O Jerusalem, that bringest good tidings; (or, 

thou that tellest good tidings to Jerusalem) lift up thy voice 
with strength ; lift it up, be not afraid ; say unto the cities of 
Judah, Behold your God ! Behold the Lord your God will come 
with strong hand (or, against the strong) ; and his arm shall 
rule for him; behold, his reward is with him, and his work 
before him (or, recompense for his work). He shall feed his 
flock like a shepherd ; he shall gather his lambs with his arms, 
and carry them in his bosom, and shall gently lead those that 
are with young. Who hath measured the waters in the hollow of 
his hand, and meted out heaven with the span, and comprehended 
the dust of the earth in a measure, weighed the mountains in 
scales, and the hills in a balance ? Who hath directed the Spirit 
of the Lord, or, being his counselor, hath taught him? With 
whom took he counsel, and who instructed him and taught him 
in the past of judgment, and taught him knowledge and showed 
to him the way of understanding? Behold, the nations are as a 
drop of a bucket and are counted as the small dust of the balance : 
behold, he taketh up the isles as a very little thing. And Lebanon 
is not sufficient to burn, nor the beast thereof sufficient for a 
burnt offering. All nations are before him as nothing, and they 
are counted to him less than nothing, and vanity." Jeremiah li. 
15, 16: "He (the Lord) hath made the earth by his power, he 
hath established the world by his wisdom, and hath stretched out 
the heaven by his understanding. When he uttereth his voice 
there is a multitude of waters in the heavens, and he causeth the 
vapors to ascend from the ends of the earth ; he maketh light- 
nings with rain, and bringeth forth the wind out of his treasures. 

1 Corinthians viii. 6 : "But to us there is but one God, the Father, 
of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus 
Christ by whom are all things, and we by him." Lecture ii. 2 

How did men first come to the knowledge of the existence 
of a God, so as to exercise faith in him? In order to answer 
this question, it will be necessary to go back and examine 
man at his creation ; the circumstances in which he was placed, 
and the knowledge which he had of God. Lecture ii. 3, 4, 5, 6, 



LECTURES ON FAITH 25 

7, 8, 9, 10, 11. First, when man was created he stood in the 
presence of God. Genesis i. 27, 28. From this we learn that 
man, at his creation, stood in the presence of his God, and had 
most perfect knowledge of his existence. Secondly, God con- 
versed with him after his transgression. Genesis iii. from the 
8th to the 22nd. Lecture ii. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. From this we 
learn that, though man did transgress, he was not deprived 
of the previous knowledge which he had of the existence of 
God. Lecture ii. 19. Thirdly, God conversed with man after 
he cast him out of the garden. Lecture ii. 22, 23, 24, 25. Fourth- 
ly, God also conversed with Cain after he had slain Abel. Genesis 
iv. from the 4th to the 6th. Lecture ii. 26, 27, 28, 29. 

What is the object of the foregoing quotation? It is that it 
may be clearly seen how it was that the first thoughts were 
suggested to the minds of men of the existence of God, and how 
extensively this knowledge was spread among the immediate 
descendants of Adam. Lecture ii. 30, 31, 32, 33. 
^ What testimony had the immediate descendents of Adam, 
in proof of the existence of God ? The testimony of their father. 
And after they were made acquainted with his existence, by the 
testimony of their father, they were dependent upon the exercise 
of their own faith, for a knowledge of his character, perfections, 
and attributes. Lecture ii. 23, 24, 25, 26. 

Had any other of the human family, besides Adam, a knowl- 
edge of the existence of God, in the first instance, by any other 
means than human testimony? They had not. For previous to 
the time that they could have power to obtain a manifestation 
for themselves, the all-important fact had been communicated 
to them by their common father; and so from father to child 
the knowledge was communicated as extensively as the knowl- 
edge of his existence was known ; for it was by this means, in 
the first instance, that men had a knowledge of his existence, 
Lecture ii. 35, 36. 

How do you know that the knowledge of the existence of 
God was communicated in this manner, throughout the different 
ages of the world? By the chronology obtained through the 
revelations of God. 

How would you divide that chronology in order to convey 
it to the understanding clearly? Into two parts — First, by em- 
bracing that period of the world from Adam to Noah; and 
secondly, from Noah to Abraham; from which period the 



26 LECTURES ON FAITH 

knowledge of the existence of God has been so general that it 
is a matter of no dispute in what manner the idea of his existence 
has been retained in the world. 

How many noted righteous men lived from Adam to Noah? 
Nine ; which includes Abel, who was slain by his brother. 

What are their names? Abel, Seth, Enos, Cainan, Ma- 
halaleel, Jared, Enoch, Methuselah, and Lamech. 

How old was Adam when Seth was born? One hundred 
and thirty years. Genesis v. 3. 

How many years did Adam live after Seth was born? 
Eight hundred. Genesis v. 4. 

How old was Adam when he died? Nine hundred and 
thirty years. Genesis v. 5. 

How old was Seth when Enos was born? One hundred 
and five years. Genesis v. 6. 

How old was Enos when Cainan was born? Ninety years. 
Genesis v. 9. 

How old was Cainan when Mahalaleel was born? Seventy 
years. Genesis v. 12. 

How old was Mahalaleel when Jared was born? Sixty-five 
years. Genesis v. 15. 

How old was Jared when Enoch was born? One hundred 
and sixty-two years. Genesis v. 18. 

How old was Enoch when Methuselah was born? Sixty- 
five years. Genesis v. 21. 

How old was Methuselah when Lamech was born? One 
hundred and eighty-seven years. Genesis v. 25. 

How old was Lamech when Noah was born ? One hundred 
and eighty-two years. Genesis v. 28. For this chronology, see 
Lecture ii. 37. 

How many years, according to this account, was it from 
Adam to Noah ? One thousand and fifty-six years. 

How old was Lamech when Adam died ? Lamech, the ninth 
from Adam (including Abel), and father of Noah, was fifty-six 
years old when Adam died. 

How old was Methuselah? Two hundred and forty-three 
years. 

How old was Enoch ? Three hundred and eight years. 

How old was Jared? Four hundred and seventy years. 

How old was Mahalaleel? Five hundred and thirty-five 
years. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 27 

How old was Cainan ? Six hundred and five years. 

How old was Enos? Six hundred and ninety-five years. 

How old was Seth? Eight hundred years. For this item of 
the account, see lecture ii. 38. 

How many of these noted men were cotemporary with 
Adam? Nine. 

What are their names ? Abel, Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahala- 
leel, Jared, Enoch, Methuselah and Lamech. Lecture ii. 39. 

How long did Seth live after Enos was born? Eight 
hundred and seven years. Genesis v. 7. 

What was Seth's age when he died? Nine hundred and 
twelve years. Genesis v. 8. 

How long did Enos live after Cainan was born? Eight 
hundred and fifteen years. Genesis v. 10. 

What was Enos's age when he died? Nine hundred and- 
five years. Genesis v. 11. 

How long did Cainan live after Mahalaleel was born? 
Eight hundred and forty years. Genesis v. 13. 

What was Cainan's age when he died ? Nine hnudred and 
ten years. Genesis v. 14. 

How long did Mahalaleel live after Jared was born? Eight 
hundred and thirty years. Genesis v. 16. 

What was Mahalaleel's age when he died ? Eight hundred 
and ninety-five years. Genesis v. 17. 

How long did Jared live after Enoch was born? Eight 
hundred years. Genesis v. 19. 

What was Jared's age when he died? Nine hundred and 
sixty-two years. Genesis v. 20. 

How long did Enoch walk with God after Methuselah 
was born? Three hundred years. Genesis v. 22. 

What was Enoch's age when he was translated? Three 
hundred and sixty-five years. Genesis v. 23.* 

*For Enoch's age, see Covenants and Commandments, Section 107. 49. 

How long did Methuselah live after Lamech was born? 
Seven hundred and eighty-two years. Genesis v. 26. 

What was Methuselah's age when he died ? Nine hundred 
and sixty-nine years. Genesis v. 27. 

How long did Lamech live after Noah was born? Five 
hundred and ninety-five years. Genesis v. 30. 

What was Lamech's age when he died? Seven hundred 
and seventy-seven years. Genesis v. 31. For the account of the 
last item see lecture ii- 40. 



28 LECTURES ON FAITH 

In what year of the world did Adam die? In the nine 
hundred and thirtieth. 

In what year was Enoch translated ?* In the nine hundred 
and eighty-seventh. 

In what year did Seth die? In one thousand and forty- 
second. 

In what year did Enos die? In the eleven hundred and 
fortieth. 

In what year did Cainan die? In the twelve hundred and 
thirty-fifth. 

In what year did Mahalaleel die? In the twelve hundred 
and ninetieth. 

In what year did Jared die ? In the fourteen hundred and 
twenty-second. 

In what year did Lamech die ? In the sixteen hundred and 
fifty-first. 

In what year did Methuselah die? In the sixteen hundred 
and fifty-sixth. For this account see lecture ii. 41. 

How old was Noah when Enos died? Eighty-four years. 

How old when Cainan died? One hundred and seventy- 
nine years. 

How old when Mahalaleel died ? Two hundred and thirty- 
four years. 

How old when Jared died? Three hundred and sixty-six 
years, 

How old when Lamech died ? Five hundred and ninety-five 
years. 

How old when Methuselah died ? Six hundred years. See 
lecture ii. 42, for the last item. 

How many of those men lived in the days of Noah ? Six. 

What are their names? Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, 
Methuselah, and Lamech. Lecture ii. 43. 

How many of those men were cotemporary with Adam 
and Noah both ? Six. 

What are their names? Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, 
Methuselah, and Lamech. Lecture ii. 43. 

According to the foregoing account how was the knowledge 
of the existence of God first suggested to the minds of men? 
By the manifestation made to our father Adam, when he was 
in the presence of God, both before and while he was in Eden. 
Lecture ii. 44. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 29 

How was the knowledge of the existence of God disem- 
inated among the inhabitants of the world? By tradition 
from father to son. Lecture ii. 44. 

How old was Noah when Shem was born? Five hundred 
and two years. Genesis v. 32. 

What was the term of years from the birth of Shem to 
the flood? Ninety-eight. 

What was the term of years that Noah lived after the 
flood ? Three hundred and fifty. Genesis ix. 28. 

What was Noah's age when he died? Nine hundred and 
fifty years. Genesis ix. 29. Lecture ii. 45. 

What was Shem's age when Arphaxad was born? One 
hundred years. Genesis xi. 10. 

What was Arphaxad's age when Salah was born? Thir- 
ty-five years. Genesis xi. 12. 

What was Salah's age when Eber was born? Thirty 
years. Genesis xi. 16. 

What was Eber's age when Peleg was born? Thirty- 
four years. Genesis xi. 14. 

What was Peleg's age when Reu was born? Thirty 
years. Genesis xi. 18. 

What was Reu's age when Serug was born? Thirty-two 
years. Genesis xi. 20. 

What was Serug's age when Nahor was born? Thirty 
years. Genesis xi. 22. 

What was Nahor's age when Terah was born? Twenty- 
nine years. Genesis xi. 24. 

What was Terah's age when Nahor (the father of Abra- 
ham) was born? Seventy years. Genesis xi. 26. 

What was Terah's age when Abraham was born? Some 
suppose one hundred and thirty years, and others seventy. 
Genesis xi. 26. Lecture ii. 46. 

What was the number of years from the flood to the 
birth of Abraham? Supposing Abraham to have been born 
when Terah was one hundred and thirty years old, it was 
three hundred and fifty-two years : but if he was born when 
Terah was seventy years old, it was two hundred and ninety- 
two years. Lecture ii. 47. 

How long did Shem live after Arphaxad was born? Five 
hundred years. Genesis xi. 11. 

What was Shem's age when he died? Six hundred years. 
Genesis xi. 11. 



30 LECTURES ON FAITH 

What number of years did Arphaxad live after Salah 
was born? Four hundred and three years. Genesis xi. 13. 

What was Arphaxad' s age when he died? Four hundred 
and thirty-three years. 

What number of years did Eber live after Peleg was 
born ? Four hundred and three years. 

What was Salah's age when he died? Four hundred 
and thirty-three years. 

What number of years did Eber live after Peleg was 
born ? Four hundred and thirty years. Genesis xi. 1/ . 

What was Eber's age when he died ? Four hundred and 
sixty-four years. 

What number of years did Peleg live after Reu was 
born? Two hundred and nine years. Genesis xi. 19. 

What was Peleg's age when he died? Two hundred and 
thirty-nine years. 

What number of years did Reu live after Serug was born ? 
Two hundred and seven years. Genesis xi. 21. 

What was Reu's age when he died? Two hundred and 
thirty-nine years. 

What number of years did Serug live after Nahor was 
born? Two hundred years. Genesis xi. 23. 

What was Serug's age when he died? Two hundred and 
thirty years. 

What number of years did Nahor live after Terah was 
born? One hundred and nineteen years. Genesis xi. 25. 

What was Nahor's age when he died? One hundred and 
forty-eight years. 

What number of years did Terah live after Abraham 
was born? Supposing Terah to have been one hundred and 
thirty years old when Abraham was born, he lived seventy- 
five years ; but if Abraham was born when Terah was seven- 
ty-five years old, he lived one hundred and thirty-five. 

What was Terah's age when he died? Two hundred and 
five years. Genesis xi. 32. For this account, from the birth 
of Arphaxad to the death of Terah, see lecture ii. 48. 

In what year of the world did Peleg die? Agreeable to 
the foregoing chronology, he died in the nineteen hundred 
and ninety-sixth year of the world. 

In what year of the world did Nahor die? In the nine- 
teen hundred and ninety-seventh. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 31 

In what year of the world did Noah die ? In the two thou- 
sand and sixth. 

In what year of the world did Reu die ? In the two thou- 
sand and twenty-sixth. 

In what year of the world did Serug die? In the two 
thousand and forty-ninth. 

In what year of the world did Terah die? In the two 
thousand and eighty-third. 

In what year of the world did Arphaxad die? In the two 
thousand and ninety-sixth 

In what year of the world did Salah die? In the twenty- 
one hundred and twenty-sixth. 

In what year of the world did Abraham die ? In the twenty- 
one hundred and eighty-third. 

In what year of the world did Eber die? In the twenty- 
one hundred and eighty-seventh. For this account of the year 
of the world in which those men died, see lecture ii. 49, 50. 

How old was Nahor (Abraham's brother) when Noah 
died? Fifty-eight years. 

How old was Terah ? One hundred and twenty-eight. 

How old was Serug? One hundred and eighty-seven. 

How old was Reu? Two hundred and nineteen. 

How old was Eber? Two hundred and eighty-three. 

How old was Salah ? Three hundred and thirteen. 

How old was Arphaxad? Three hundred and fory-eight. 

How old was Shem? Four hundred and forty-eight. 

For the last account see lecture ii. 51. 

How old was Abraham when Reu died? Eighteen years, 
if he was born when Terah was one hundred and thirty years 
old. 

What was his age when Serug and Nahor (Abraham's 
brother) died? Forty-one years. 

What was his age when Terah died ? Seventy-five years. 

What was his age when Arphaxad died ? Eighty-eight. 

What was his age when Salah died? One hundred and 
eighteen years. 

What was his age when Shem died? One hundred and 

fifty years. For this see lecture ii. 52. 

How many noted characters lived from Noah to Abraham ? 
Ten. 

What are their names? Shem, Arphaxad, Salah, Eber, 



32 LECTURES ON FAITH 

Peleg, Reu, Serug, Nahor, Terah, and Nahor, (Abraham's 
brother). Lecture ii. 52. 

How many of these were cotemporary with Noah? The 
whole. 

How many with Abraham? Eight. 

What are their names? Nahor (Abraham's brother) Terah, 
Serug, Reu, Eber, Salah, Arphaxad, and Shem. Lecture ii. 52. 

How many were cotemporary with both Noah and Abra- 
ham ? Eight. 

What are their names ? Shem, Arphaxad, Salah, Eber, Reu, 
Serug, Terah, and Nahor (Abraham's brother). Lecture ii. 52. 

Did any of these men die before Noah? They did. 

Who were they ? Peleg, in whose days the earth was divid- 
ed, and Nahor, (Abraham's grandfather). Lecture ii. 49. 

Did any one of them live longer than Abraham ? There was 
one. Lecture ii. 50. 

Who was he ? Eber, the fourth from Noah. Lecture ii. 50. 

In whose days was the earth divided ? In the days of Peleg. 

Where have we the account given that the earth was divided 
in the days of Peleg? Genesis x. 25. 

Can you repeat the sentence? "Unto Eber were born two 
sons : the name of one was Peleg, for in his days the earth was 
divided." 

What testimony have men, in the first instance, that there 
is a God? Human testimony, and human testimony only. 
Lecture ii. 56. 

What excited the ancient saints to seek diligently after a 
knowledge of the glory of God, his perfections and attributes? 
The credence they gave to the testimony of their fathers. Lec- 
ture ii. 56. 

*— ' How do men obtain a knowledge of the glory of God, his 
perfections and attributes? By devoting themselves to his ser- 
vice, through prayer and supplication incessantly strengthening 
their faith in him, until, like Enoch, the brother of Jared, and 
Moses, they obtain a manifestation of God to themselves. 
Lecture ii. 55. 

<^kl Is the knowledge of the existence of God a matter of mere 
tradition, founded upon human testimony alone, until persons 
receive a manifestation of God to themselves? It is. 

How do you prove it? From the whole of the first and 
second lectures. 



LECTURE THIRD 

1. In the second lecture it was shewn how it was that the 
knowledge of the existence of God came into the world, and by 
what means the first thoughts were suggested to the minds of 
men that such a Being did actually exist; and that it was by 
reason of the knowledge of his existence that there was a founda- 
tion laid for the exercise of faith in him, as the only Being in 
whom faith could center for life and salvation ; for faith could 
not center in a Being of whose existence we have- no idea, because 
the idea of his existence in the first instance is essential to the 
exercise of faith in him. Romans x. 14: "How then shall they 
call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they 
believe in him of whom they have not heard ? and how shall they 
hear without a preacher (or one sent to tell them) ? So, then, 
faith comes by hearing the word of God." (Xew Translation). 

2. Let us here observe, that three things are necessary in 
order that any rational and intelligent being may exercise faith 
in God unto life and salvation. 

3. First, the idea that he actually exists. 

4. Secondly, a correct idea of his character, perfections, 
and attributes. 

5. Thirdly, an actual knowledge that the course of life 
which he is pursuing is according to hisjwill. For without an 
acquaintance with these three important facts, the faith of even- 
rational being must be imperfect and unproductive : but with this 
understanding it can become perfect and fruitful, abounding 
in righteousness, unto the praise and glory of God the Father, 
and the Lord Jesus Christ. 

6. Having previously been made acquainted with the way 
the idea of his existence came into the world, as well as the 
fact of his existence, we shall proceed to examine his character, 
perfections, and attributes, in order that this class may see, not 
only the just grounds which they have for the exercise of faith in 
him for life and salvation, but the reasons that all the world, 
also, as far as the idea of his existence extends, may have to 
exercise faith in him, the Father of all living. 

7. As we have been indebted to a revelation which God 
made of himself to his creatures, in the first instance, for the 
idea of his existence, so in like manner we are indebted to the 



34 LECTURES ON FAITH 

revelations which he has given to us for a correct understand- 
ing of his character, perfections, and attributes; because without 
the revelations which he has given to us, no man by searching 
could find out God. Job. xi. 7, 8, 9. 1 Corinthians ii. 9, 10, 11. 
"But as it is written, eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither 
have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath 
prepared for them that love him; but God hath revealed them 
unto us by his Spirit, for the Spirit searcheth all things, yea, 
the deep things of God, For what man knoweth the things of a 
man, save the spirit of man which is in him ? Even so, the things 
of God knoweth no man but the Spirit of God." 

8. Having said so much we proceed to examine the char- 
acter which the revelations have given of God. 

9. Moses gives us the following account in Exodus, xxxiv. 
6 : "And the Lord passed by before him, and proclaimed, The 
Lord God, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering 
and abundant in goodness and truth/ " Psalm ciii. 6, 7, 8: "The 
Lord executeth righteousness and judgment for all that are 
oppressed. He made known his ways unto Moses, his acts unto 
the children of Israel. The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow 
to anger and plenteous in mercy." Psalm ciii. 17, 18: "But the 
mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting upon them 
that fear him, and his righteousness unto children's children, to 
such as keep his covenant, and to those that remember his com- 
mandments to do them." Psalm xc. 2 : "Before the mountains 
were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and 
the world, even from everlasting to everlasting thou art God." 
Hebrews i. 10, 11, 12: And thou, Lord, in the beginning, hast 
laid the foundation of the earth ; and the heavens are the works 
of thine hands : they shall perish, but thou remainest ; and they 
all shall wax old as doth a garment ; and as a vesture shalt thou 
fold them up, and they shall be changed ; but thou art the same 
and thy years shall not fail." James i. 17: "Every good gift 
and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the 
Father of lights, with whom is iio variableness, neither shadow 
of turning." Malachi iii. 6: "For I am the Lord, I change not; 
therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed." 

10. Book of Commandments, Sec. 3, v. 2 : "For God does 
not walk in crooked paths, neither does he turn to the right 
hand or the left, or vary from that which he has said, therefore 
his paths are straight, and his course is one eternal round." Book 



LECTURES ON FAITH 35 

of G>mmandments, Sec. 35, v. 1 : "Listen to the voice of the 
Lord your God, even Alpha and Omega, the beginning and 
the end, whose course is one eternal round, the same yesterday, 
to-day, and forever/' 

11. Numbers xxiii. 19: "God is not a man that he should 
lie, neither the son of man that he should repent." 1 John iv. 8: 
"He that loveth not, knoweth not God, for God is love/' Acts x. 
34, 35 : "Then Peter opened his mouth and said, 'Of a truth I 
perceive that God is no respecter of persons, but in every nation 
he that feareth God and worketh righteousness is accepted with 
him/ " 

12. From the foregoing testimonies we learn the following 
things respecting the character of God : 

13. First, that he was God before the world was created, 
and the same God that he was after it was created. 

14. Secondly, that he is merciful and gracious, slow to 
anger, abundant in goodness, and that he was so from everlast- 
ing, and will be to everlasting. 

15. Thirdly, that he changes not, neither is there variable- 
ness with him ; but that he is the same from everlasting to ever- 
lasting, being the same yesterday, to-day, and for ever; and 
that his course is one eternal round, without variation. 

16. Fourthly, that he is a God of truth and cannot lie. 

17. Fifthly, that he is no respecter of persons : but in every 
nation he that fears God and works righteousness is accepted 
of him. 

18. Sixthly, that he is love. 

19. An acquaintance with these attributes in the divine 
character, is essentially necessary, in order that the faith of any 
rational being can center in him for life and salvation. For if 
he did not, in the first instance, believe him to be God, that is, 
the Creator and upholder of all things, he could not center his 
faith in him for life and salvation, for fear there should be 
greater than he who would thwart all his plans, and he like the 
gods of the heathen, would be unable to fulfill his promises; 
but seeing he is God over all, from everlasting to everlasting, 
the Creator and upholder of all things, no such fear can exist 
in the minds of those who put their trust in him, so that in this 
respect their 5 faith can be without wavering. 

20. But secondly; unless he was merciful and gracious, 
slow to anger, long-suffering and full of goodness, such is the 



36 LECTURES ON FAITH 

weakness of human nature, and so great the frailties and imper- 
fections of men, that unless they believed that these excellencies 
existed in the divine character, the faith necessary to salvation 
could not exist; for doubt would take the place of faith, and 
those who know their weakness and liability to sin would be in 
constant doubt of salvation if it were not for the idea which 
they have of the excellency of the character of God, that he is 
slow to anger and long-suffering, and of a forgiving disposition, 
and does forgive iniquity, transgression, and sin. An idea of 
these facts does away doubt, and makes faith exceedingly strong. 

21. But it is equally as necessary that men should have 
the idea that he is a God who changes not, in order to have faith 
in him, as it is to have the idea that he is gracious and long-suf- 
fering ; for without the idea of unchangeableness in the character 
of the Deity, doubt would take the place of faith. But with the 
idea that he changes not, faith lays hold upon the excellencies in 
his character with unshaken confidence, believing he is the same 
yesterday, to-day, and forever, and that his course is one eternal 
round. 

22. And again, the idea that he is a God of truth and cannot 
lie, is equally as necessary to the exercise of faith in him as the 
idea of his unchangeableness. For without the idea that he was a 
God of truth and could not lie, the confidence necessary to be 
placed in his word in order to the exercise of faith in him could 
not exist. But having the idea that he is not man, that he cannot 
lie, it gives power to the minds of men to exercise faith in him. 

23. But it is also necessary that men should have an idea 
that he is no respecter of persons, for with the idea of all the 
other excellencies in his character, and this one wanting, men 
could not exercise faith in him ; because if he were a respecter 
of persons, they could not tell what their privileges were, nor 
how far they were authorized to exercise faith in him, or 
whether they were authorized to do it at all, but all must be 
confusion ; but no sooner are the minds of men made acquainted 
with the truth on this point, that he is no respecter of persons, 
than they see that they have authority by faith to lay hold on 
eternal life, the richest boon of heaven, because God is no re- 
specter of persons, and that every man in every nation has an 
equal privilege. 

24. And lastly, but not less important to the exercise of 
faith in God, is the idea that he is love; for with all the other 



LECTURES ON FAITH 37 

excellencies in his character, without this one to influence them, 
they could not have such powerful dominion over the minds of 
men; but when the idea is planted in the mind that he is love, 
who cannot see the just ground that men of every nation, kindred, 
and tongue, have to exercise faith in God so as to obtain eternal 
life? 

25. From the above description of the character of the 
Deity, which is given him in the revelations to men, there is a 
sure foundation for the exercise of faith in him among every 
people, nation, and kindred, from age to age, and from genera- 
tion to generation. 

26. Let us here observe that the foregoing is the character 
which is given of God in his revelations to the Former-day 
Saints, and it is also the character which is given of him in his 
revelations to the Latter-day Saints, so that the saints of former 
days and those of latter days are both alike in this respect ; the 
Latter-day Saints having as good grounds to exercise faith in 
God as the Former-day Saints had, because the same character 
is given of him to both. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON THE FOREGOING PRINCIPLES 

What was shown in the second lecture ? It was shown how 
the knowledge of the existence of God came into the world. 
Lecture iii. 1. 

What is the effect of the idea of his existence among men ? 
It lays the foundation for the exercise of faith in him. Lecture 
iii. 1. 

Is the idea of his existence, in the first instance, necessary 
in order for the exercise of faith in him ? It is. Lecture iii. 1. 

How do you prove it ? By the tenth chapter of Romans and 
fourteenth verse. Lecture iii. 1. 

How many things are necessary for us to understand, res- 
pecting the Deity and our relation to him, in order that we may 
exercise faith in him for life and salvation? Three. Lecture iii. 2. 

What are they ? First, that God does actually exist ; secondly, 
correct ideas of his character, his perfections and attributes ; and 
thirdly, that the course which we pursue is according to his 
mind and will. Lecture iii. 3, 4, 5. 

Would the idea of any one or two of the above-mentioned 
things enable a person to exercise faith in God ? It would not, 



38 LECTURES ON FAITH 

for without the idea of them all faith would be imperfect and 
unproductive. Lecture iii. 5. 

Would an idea of these three things lay a sure foundation 
for the exercise of faith in God, so as to obtain life and salvation ? 
It would ; for by the idea of these three things, faith could be- 
come perfect and fruitful, abounding in righteousness unto the 
praise and glory of God. Lecture iii. 5. 

How are we to be made acquainted with the before-men- 
tioned things respecting the Deity, and respecting ourselves? 
By revelation. Lecture iii. 6. 

Could these things be found out by any other means than 
by revelation? They could not. 

How do you prove it? By the scriptures. Job xi. 7, 8, 9. 
1 Corinthians ii. 9, 10, 11. Lecture iii. 7. 

What things do we learn in the revelations of God respect- 
ing his character ? We learn the six following things : First, that 
he was God before the world was created, and the same God 
that he was after it was created. Secondly, that he is merciful 
and gracious, slow to anger, abundant in goodness, and that he 
was so from everlasting, and will be so to everlasting. Thirdly, 
that he changes not, neither is there variableness with him, and 
that his course is one eternal round. Fourthly, that he is a God 
of truth, and cannot lie. Fifthly, that he is no respecter of 
persons; and sixthly, that he is love. Lecture iii. 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 18. 

Where do you find the revelations which gives us this idea 
of the character of the Deity? In the Bible and Book of Com- 
mandments, and they are quoted in the third lecture. Lecture 
iii. 9, 10, 11. 

What effect would it have on any rational being not to have 
an idea that the Lord was God, the Creator and upholder of all 
things? It would prevent him from exercising faith in him 
unto life and salvation. 

Why would it prevent him from exercising faith in God? 
Because he would be as the heathen, not knowing but there he 
might be a being greater and more powerful than he, and thereby 
be prevented from filling his promises. Lecture iii. 19. 

Does this idea prevent this doubt? It does; for persons 
having this idea are enabled thereby to exercise faith without 
this doubt. Lecture iii. 19. 

Is it not also necessary to have the idea that God is merciful 



LECTURES ON FAITH 39 

and gracious, long-suffering and full of goodness ? It is. Lecture 
iii. 20. 

Why is it necessary? Because of the weakness and imper- 
fections of human nature, and the great frailties of man; for 
such is the weakness of man, and such his frailties, that he is 
liable to sin continually, and if God were not long-suffering, 
and full of compassion, gracious and merciful, and of a forgiv- 
ing disposition, man would be cut off from before him, in con- 
sequence of which he would be in continual doubt and could 
not exercise faith ; for where doubt is, there faith has no power ; 
but by man's believing that God is full of compassion and for- 
giveness, long-suffering and slow to anger, he can exercise 
faith in him and overcome doubt, so as to be exceedingly strong. 
Lecture iii. 20. 

Is it not equally as necessary that man should have an idea 
that God changes not, neither is there variableness with him, in 
order to exercise faith in him unto life and salvation? It is; 
because without this, he would not know how soon the mercy of 
God might change into cruelty, his long-suffering into rashness, 
his love into hatred, and in consequence of which doubt man 
would be incapable of exercising faith in him, but having the 
idea that he is unchangeable, man can have faith in him con- 
tinually, believing that what he was yesterday he is to-day, and 
will be forever. Lecture iii. 21. 

Is it not necessary also, for men to have an idea that God 
is a being of truth before they can have perfect faith in him? 
It is ; for unless men have this idea they cannot place confidence 
in his word, and, not being able to place confidence in his word, 
they could not have faith in him ; but believing that he is a God 
of truth, and that his word cannot fail, their faith can rest in 
him without doubt Lecture iii. 22. 

Could man exercise faith in God so as to obtain eternal 
life unless he believed that God was no respecter of persons? 
He could not ; because without this idea he could not certainly 
know that it was his privilege so to do, and in consequence of 
this doubt his faith could not be sufficiently strong to save him. 
Lecture iii. 23. 

Would it be possible for a man to exercise faith in God, so 
as to be saved, unless he had an idea that God was love ? He could 
not ; because man could not love God unless he had an idea that 



40 LECTURES ON FAITH 

God was love, and if he did not love God he could not have faith 
in him. Lecture iii. 24. 

What is the description which the sacred writers give of 
the character of the Deity calculated to do? It is calculated- to 
lay a foundation for the exercise of faith in him, as far as the 
knowledge extends, among all people, tongues, languages, kin- 
dreds and nations, and that from age to age, and from generation 
to generation. Lecture iii. 25. 

Is the character which God has given of himself uniform? 
It is, in all his revelations, whether to the Former-day Saints, or 
to the Latter-day Saints, so that they all have the authority to 
exercise faith in him, and to expect, by the exercise of their 
faith, to enjoy the same blessings. Lecture iii. 26. 



The Following Excerpt Is Not A Part of The Lectures On 

Faith 

There are but a very few beings in the world who understand rightly 
the character of God. The great majority of mankind do not comprehend 
anything, either that which is past, or that which is to come, as it respects 
their relationship to God. They do not know, neither do they understand 
the nature of that relationship and consequently they know but little above 
the brute beast, or more than to eat, drink and sleep. This is all man 
knows about God or his existence, unless it is given by the inspiration 
of the Almighty. 

If a man learns nothing more than to eat, drink and sleep, and does 
not comprehend any of the designs of God, the beast comprehends the 
same things. It eats, drinks, sleeps, and knows nothing more about God ; 
yet it knows as much as we, unless we are able to comprehend by the 
inspiration of Almighty God. If men do not comprehend the character 
of God, they do not comprehend themselves. I want to go back to the 
beginning, and so lift your minds into a more lofty sphere and a more 
exalted understanding than what the human mind generally aspires to. 
sf King Follett" discourse, by Joseph the Prophet. See The Vision, pp. 
15-16. 



LECTURE FOURTH 

1. Having shown, in the third lecture, that correct ideas 
of the character of God are necessary in order to the exercise of 
faith in him unto life and salvation; and that without correct 
ideas of his character the minds of men could not have sufficient 
power with God to the exercise of faith necessary to the enjoy- 
ment of eternal life ; and that correct ideas of his character lay 
a foundation, as far as his character is concerned, for the exer- 
cise of faith, so as to enjoy the fullness of the blessing of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ even that of eternal glory ; we shall now 
proceed to show the connection there is between correct ideas 
of the attributes of God, and the exercise of faith in him unto 
eternal life. 

2. Let us here observe, that the real design which the God 
of heaven had in view in making the human family acquainted 
with his attributes, was, that they, through the ideas of the 
existence of his attributes, might be enabled to exercise faith 
in him, and through the exercise of faith in him, might obtain 
eternal life ; for without the idea of the existence of the attributes 
which belong to God, the minds of men could not have power 
to exercise faith in him so as to lay hold upon eternal life. The 
God of heaven, understanding most perfectly the constitution 
of human nature, and the weakness of men, knew what was 
necessary to be revealed, and what ideas must be planted in 
their minds in order that they might be enabled to exercise faith 
in him unto eternal life. 

3. Having said so much, we shall proceed to examine the 
attributes of God, as set forth in his revelations to the human 
family, and to show how necessary correct ideas of his attributes 
are to enable men to exercise faith in him ; for without these ideas 
being planted in the minds of men it would be out of the power 
of any person or persons to exercise faith in God so as to obtain 
eternal life. So that the divine communications made to men in 
the first instance were designed to establish in their minds the 
ideas necessary to enable them to exercise faith in God, and 
through this means to be partakers of his glory. 

4. We have, in the revelations which he has given to the 
human family, the following account of his attributes: 

5. First — Knowledge. Acts xv. 18: "Known unto God are 



42 LECTURES ON FAITH 

all his works from the beginning of the world," Isaiah xlvi. 9, 
10: "Remember the former things of old: for I am God, and 
there is none else ; I am God, and there is none like me, declaring 
the end from the beginning, and from ancient time the things 
that are not yet done, saying 'My counsel shall stand, and I will 
do all my pleasure.' " 

6. Secondly — Faith or power. Hebrews xi 3: "Through 
faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of 
God." Genesis i. 1 : "In the beginning God created the heaven 
and the earth." Isaiah xiv. 24, 27: "The Lord of hosts hath 
sworn, saying, 'Surely as I have thought, so shall it come to pass : 
and as I have purposed so shall it stand. For the Lord of Hosts 
hath purposed, and who shall disannul it? and his hand is 
stretched out, and who shall turn it back?' " 

7. Thirdly — Justice. Psalm lxxxix. 14: "Justice and judg- 
ment are the habitation of thy throne." Isaiah xlv. 21 : "Tell 
ye, and bring them near; yea, let them take counsel together: 
who hath declared this from the ancient time? have not I the 
Lord? and there is no God else beside me; a just God and a 
Saviour." Zephaniah iii. 5. "The just Lord is in the midst 
thereof." Zechariah ix. 9: "Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion ; 
shout, O daughter of Jerusalem ; behold thy King cometh unto 
thee: he is just and having salvation." 

8. Fourthly — Judgment. Psalm lxxxix. 14: "Justice and 
judgment are the habitation of thy throne." Deuteronomy xxxil 
4: "He is the Rock, his work is perfect; for all his ways are 
judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is 
he." Psalm ix. 7 : "But the Lord shall endure for ever. He 
hath prepared his throne for judgment." Psalm ix. 16: "The 
Lord is known by the judgment which he executeth." 

9. Fifthly — Mercy. Psalm lxxxix. 14 : "Mercy and truth 
shall go before his face." Exodus xxxiv. 6: "And the Lord 
passed by before him, and proclaimed, 'The Lord, the Lord 
God, merciful and gracious.' " Nehemiah ix. 17: "But thou art 
a God ready to pardon, gracious and merciful." 

10. And sixthly — Truth. Psalm lxxxix. 14: "Mercy and 
truth shall go before thy face." Exodus xxxiv. 6 : "Long-suffer- 
ing and abundant in goodness and truth." Deuteronomy xxxii. 
4: "He is the Rock, his work is perfect; for all his ways are 
judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right is 



LECTURES ON FAITH 43 

he." Psalm xxxi. 5 : "Into Thine hand I commit my spirit : thou 
hast redeemed me, O Lord God of Truth." 

11. By a little reflection it will be seen that the idea of the 
existence of these attributes in the Deity is necessary to enable 
any rational being to exercise faith in him ; for without the idea 
of the existence of these attributes in the Deity men could 
not exercise faith in him for life and salvation ; seeing that with- 
out the knowledge of all things, God would not be able to save 
any portion of his creatures ; for it is by reason of the knowledge 
which he has of all things, from the beginning to the end, that 
enables him to give that understanding to his creatures by which 
they are made partakers of eternal life ; and if it were not for the 
idea existing in the minds of men that God had all knowledge 
it would be impossible for them to exercise faith in him. 

12. And it is not less necessary that men should have the idea 
of the existence of the attribute power in the Deity ; for unless 
God had power over all things, and was able by his power to 
control all things, and thereby deliver his creatures who put their 
trust in him from the power of all beings that might seek their 
destruction, whether in heaven, on earth, or in hell, men could 
not be saved. But with the idea of the existence of this attribute 
planted in the mind, men feel as though they had nothing to 
fear who put their trust in God, believing that he has power to 
save all who come to him to the very uttermost. 

13. It is also necessary, in order to the exercise of faith in 
God unto life and salvation, that men should have the idea of 
the existence of the attribute justice in him ; for without the idea 
of the existence of the attribute justice in the Deity, men could 
not have confidence sufficient to place themselves under his 
guidance and direction; for they would be filled with fear and 
doubt lest the judge of all the earth would not do right, and thus 
fear or doubt, existing in the mind, would preclude the possibility 
of the exercise of faith in him for life and salvation. But when 
the idea of the existence of the attribute justice in the Deity is 
fairly planted in the mind, it leaves no room for doubt to get 
into the heart, and the mind is enabled to cast itself upon the 
Almighty without fear and without doubt, and with the most 
unshaken confidence, believing that the Judge of all the earth 
will do right. 

14. It is also of equal importance that men should have the 
idea of the existence of the attribute judgment in God, in order 



44 LECTURES ON FAITH 

that they may exercise faith in him for life and salvation; for 
without the idea of the existence of this attribute in the Deity, 
it would be impossible for men to exercise faith in him for life 
and salvation, seeing that it is through the exercise of this 
attribute that the faithful in Christ Jesus are delivered out of 
the hands of those who seek their destruction; for if God were 
not to come out in swift judgment against the workers of iniquity 
and the powers of darkness, his saints could not be saved ; for 
it is by judgment that the Lord delivers his saints out of the hands 
of all their enemies, and those who reject the gospel of our Lord 
Jesus Christ. But no sooner is the idea of the existence of this 
attribute planted in the minds of men, than it gives power to the 
mind for the exercise of faith and confidence in God, and they are 
enabled by faith to lay hold on the promises which are set before 
them, and wade through all the tribulations and afflictions to 
which they are subjected by reason of the persecution from 
those who know not God, and obey not the gospel of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, believing that in due time the Lord will come out 
in swift judgment against their enemies, and they shall be cut off 
from before him, and that in his own due time he will bear them off 
conquerors, and more than conquerors, in all things. 

15. And again, it is equally important that men should have 
the idea of the existence of the attribute mercy in the Deity, in 
order to exercise faith in him for life and salvation; for without 
the idea of the existence of this attribute in the Deity, the spirits 
of the saints would faint in the midst of the tribulations, afflic- 
tions, and persecutions which they have to endure for righteous- 
ness' sake. But when the idea of the existence of this attribute 
is once established in the mind it gives life and energy to the 
spirits of the saints, believing that the mercy of God will be 
poured out upon them in the midst of their afflictions, and that 
he will compassionate them in their sufferings, and that the mercy 
of God will lay hold of them and secure them in the arms of his 
love, so that they will receive a full reward for all their suffer- 
ings. 

16. And lastly, but not less important to the exercise of faith 
in God, is the idea of the existence of the attribute truth in him ; 
for without the idea of the existence of this attribute the mind 
of man could have nothing upon which it could rest with cer- 
tainty — all would be confusion and doubt. But with the idea of 
the existence of this attribute in the Deity in the mind, all the 



LECTURES ON FAITH 45 

teachings, instructions, promises, and blessings, become realities, 
and the mind is enabled to lay hold of them with certainty and 
confidence, believing that these things, and all that the Lord has 
said, shall be fulfilled in their time; and that all the cursings, 
denunciations, and judgments, pronounced upon the heads of the 
unrighteous, will also be executed in the due time of the Lord : 
and, by reason of the truth and veracity of him, the mind beholds 
its deliverance and salvation as being certain. 

17. Let the mind once reflect sincerely and candidly upon 
the ideas of the existence of the before-mentioned attributes in 
the Deity, and it will be seen that, as far as his attributes are 
concerned, there is a sure foundation laid for the exercise of 
faith in him for life and salvation. For inasmuch as God 
possesses the attribute knowledge, he can make all things known 
to his saints necessary for their salvation ; and as he possesses the 
attribute power, he is able thereby to deliver them from the power 
of all enemies ; and seeing, also, that justice is an attribute of the 
Deity, he will deal with them upon the principles of righteousness 
and equity, and a just reward will be granted unto them for all 
their afflictions and sufferings for the truth's sake. And as 
judgment is an attribute of the Deity also, his saints can have 
the most unshaken confidence that they will, in due time, obtain 
a perfect deliverance out of the hands of their enemies, and a 
complete victory over all those who have sought their hurt and 
destruction. And as mercy is also an attribute of the Deity, his 
saints can have confidence that it will be exercised towards them, 
and through the exercise of that attribute towards them comfort 
and consolation will be administered unto them abundantly, amid 
all their afflictions and tribulations. And, lastly, realizing that 
truth is an attribute of the Deity, the mind is led to rejoice amid 
all its trials and temptations, in hope of that glory which is to be 
brought at the revelation of Jesus Christ, and in view of that 
crown which is to be placed upon the heads of the saints in the 
day when the Lord shall distribute rewards unto them, and in 
prospect of that eternal weight of glory which the Lord has 
promised to bestow upon them, when he shall bring them in the 
midst of his throne to dwell in his presence eternally. 

18. In view, then, of the existence of these attributes, the 
faith of the saints can become exceedingly strong, abounding 
in righteousness unto the praise and glory of God, and can exert 
its mighty influence in searching after wisdom and understanding, 



46 LECTURES ON FAITH 

until it has obtained a knowledge of all things that pertain to 
life and salvation. 

19. Such, then, is the foundation which is laid, through the 
revelation of the attributes of God, for the exercise of faith in 
him for life and salvation ; and seeing that these are attributes of 
the Deity, they are unchangeable — being the same yesterday, 
to-day, and for ever — which gives to the minds of the Latter-day 
Saints the same power and authority to exercise faith in God 
which the Former-day Saints had ; so that all the saints, in this 
respect, have been, are, and will be, alike until the end of time ; 
for God never changes, therefore his attributes and character 
remain forever the same. And as it is through the revelation of 
these that a foundation is laid for the exercise of faith in God 
unto life and salvation, the foundation, therefore, for the exercise 
of faith was, is, and ever will be, the same ; so that all men have 
had, and will have, an equal privilege. 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON THE FOREGOING PRINCIPLES 

What was shown in the third lecture? It was shown that 
correct ideas of the character of God are necessary in order to 
exercise faith in him unto life and salvation; and that without 
correct ideas of his character, men could not have power to 
exercise faith in him unto life and salvation, but that correct 
ideas of his character, as far as his character was concerned in 
the exercise of faith in him, lay a sure foundation for the exercise 
of it. Lecture iv. 1. 

What object had the God of Heaven in revealing his attri- 
butes to men ? That through an acquaintance with his attributes 
they might be enabled to exercise faith in him so as to obtain 
eternal life. Lecture iv. 2. 

Could men exercise faith in God without an acquaintance 
with his attributes, so as to be enabled to lay hold of eternal life? 
They could not. Lecture iv. 2, 3. 

What account is given of the attributes of God in his revela- 
tions? First, Knowledge; secondly, Faith or Power; thirdly, 
Justice ; fourthly, Judgment ; fifthly, Mercy, and sixthly, Truth. 
Lecture iv. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. 

Where are the revelations to be found which give this rela- 
tion or the attributes of God ? In the Old and New Testaments, 
and they are quoted in the fourth lecture, fifth, sixth, seventh, 
eighth, nin th and tenth paragraphs.* 

♦Let the student turn and commit these paragraphs to memory. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 47 

Is the idea of the existence of these attributes in the Deity 
necessary in order to enable any rational being to exercise faith 
in him unto life and salvation? It is. 

How do you prove it ? By the eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, 
fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth paragraphs in this lecture.* 

Does the idea of the existence of these attributes in the 
Deity, as far as his attributes are concerned, enable a rational 
being to exercise faith in him unto life and salvation ? It does. 
How do you prove it? By the seventeenth and eighteenth 
paragraphs.* 

Have the Latter-day Saints as much authority given them, 
through the revelation of the attributes of God, to exercise faith 
in him as the Former-day Saints had ? They have. 

How do you prove it? By the nineteenth paragraph of 
this lecture.* 



*Let the student turn and commit these paragraphs to memory. 



The Following Excerpt Is Not A Part of The Lectures On 

Faith 

I will go back to, the beginning before the world was, to show what 
kind of being God is. What sort a being was God in the beginning? 
Open your ears and hear, all ye ends of the earth, for I am going to 
prove it to you by the Bible, and tell you the designs of God in relation 
to the human race and why he interferes with the affairs of man. 

God himself was once as we are now, and is an exalted man, and sits 
enthroned in yonder heavens? That is the great secret. If the vail were 
rent today, and the great God who holds this world in its orbit, and who 
upholds all worlds and all things by his power, was to make himself visible 
— / say, if you were to see him today, you would see him like a man in 
form — like yourselves in all the person, image, and very form as a man; 
for Adam was created in the very fashion, image and likeness of God, and 
received instruction from, and walked, talked, and conversed imth him, 
as one man talks and communes with another. * * * I wish I was in a 
suitable place to tell it, and that I had the trumpet of an archangel, so that 
I could tell the story in such a manner that persecution would cease 
forever. What did Jesus say? (Mark it, Elder Rigdon!) The scrip- 
tures inform us that Jesus said, As the Father hath power to himself, 
even so hath the Son power — to do what? Why, what the Father did. 
The answer is obvious — in a manner to lay down his body and take 
it up again. Jesus, what are you going to do? To lay down my life 
as my Father did, and take it up again. Do you believe it? If you do 
not believe it, you do not believe the Bible. The scriptures say it and 
I defy all the learning and wisdom and all the combined powers of earth 
and hell together to refute it. "King Follett" discourse, by Joseph the 
Prophet. See The Vision, pp. 17-18. 



LECTURE FIFTH. 

1. In our former lectures we treated of the being, character, 
perfections, and attributes, of God. What we mean by perfec- 
tions is, the perfections which belong to all the attributes of his 
nature. We shall, in this lecture, speak of the Godhead — we 
mean the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. 

2. There are two personages who constitute the great, 
matchless, governing, and supreme power over all things, by 
whom all things were created and made, that are created and 
made, whether visible or invisible, whether in heaven, on earth, 
or in the earth, under the earth, or throughout the immensity of 
space. They are the Father and the Son — the Father being a 
personage of spirit, glory, and power, possessing all perfection 
and fullness, the Son, who was in the bosom of the Father, a 
personage of tabernacle, made or fashioned like unto man, or 
being in the form and likeness of man, or rather man was formed 
after his likeness and in his image f he is also the express image 
and likeness of the personage of the Father, possessing all the 
fullness of the Father, or the same fullness with the Father; 
being begotten of him, and ordained from before the foundation 
of the world to be a propitiation for the sins of all those who 
should believe on his name, and is called the Son because of the 
flesh, and descended in suffering below that which man can suffer ; 
or, in other words, suffered greater sufferings, and was exposed 
to more powerful contradictions than any man can be. But, 
notwithstanding all this, he kept the law of God, and remained 
without sin, showing thereby that it is in the power of man to 
keep the law and remain also without sin f and also, that by him 
a righteous judgment might come upon all flesh, and that all who 
walk not in the law of God may justly be condemned by the 
law, and have no excuse for their sins. And he being the Only- 
Begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth, and having over- 
come, received a fullness of the glory of the Father, possessing 
the same mind with the Father, which mind is the Holy Spirit, 
that bears record of the Father and the Son, and these three are 
one ; or, in other words, these three constitute the great, match- 
less, governing and supreme power over all things ; by whom all 
things were created and made that were created and made, and 
these three constitute the Godhead, and are one ; the Father and 



LECTURES ON FAITH 49 

the Son possessing the same mind, the same wisdom, glory, power, 
and fullness — filling all in all; the Son being filled with the 
fullness of the mind, glory, and power ; or, in other words, the 
spirit, glory, and power, of the Father, possessing all knowledge 
and glory, and the same kingdom, sitting at the right hand of 
power, in the express image and likeness of the Father, mediator 
for man, being filled with the fullness of the mind of the Father ; 
or, in other words, the Spirit of the Father, which Spirit is shed 
forth upon all who believe on his name and keep his command- 
ments; and all those who keep his commandments shall grow 
up from grace to grace, and become heirs of the heavenly king- 
dom, and joint heirs with Jesus Christ ; possessing the same mind, 
being transformed into the same image or likeness, even the ex- 
press image of him who fills all in all ; being filled with the full- 
ness of his glory, and become one in him, even as the Father, 
Son and Holy Spirit are one. 

3. From the foregoing account of the Godhead, which is 
given in his revelations, the saints have a sure foundation laid 
for the exercise of faith unto life and salvation, through the 
atonement and mediation of Jesus Christ ; by whose blood they 
have a forgiveness of sins, and also a sure reward laid up for 
them in heaven, even that of partaking of the fullness of the 
Father and the Son through the Spirit. As the Son partakes 
of the fullness of the Father through the Spirit, so the saints are, 
by the same Spirit, to be partakers of the same fullness, to enjoy 
the same glory; for as the Father and the Son are one, so, in 
like manner, the saints are to be one in them. Through the 
love of the Father, the mediation of Jesus Christ, and the gift 
of the Holy Spirit, they are to be heirs of God, and joint heirs 
with Jesus Christ. (See footnote at end of Lecture 5.) 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON THE FOREGOING PRINCIPLES 

Of what do the foregoing lectures treat? Of the being, 
perfections, and attributes of the Deity. Lecture v. 1. 

What are we to understand by the perfections of the Deity? 
The perfections which belong to his attributes. 

How many personages are there in the Godhead? Two: 
the Father and Son. Lecture v. 1. (See footnote.) 

How do you prove that there are two personages in 
the Godhead? By the Scriptures. Genesis i. 26. Also lecture 
ii. 6: "As the Lord God said unto the Only Begotten, who was 



50 LECTURES ON FAITH 

with him from the beginning, 'Let us make man in our image, 
after our likeness' — and it was done." Genesis iii. 22: "And 
the Lord God said unto the Only Begotten, 'Behold, the man is 
become as one of us: to know good and evil.' " John xvii. 5: 
"And now, O Father, glorify thou me with thine own self with 
the glory which I had with thee before the world was." Lecture 
v. 2. 

What is the Father? He is a personage of glory and of 
power. Lecture v. 2. 

How do you prove that the Father is a personage of glory 
and of power? Isaiah lx. 19: "The sun shall be no more thy 
light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto 
thee ; but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy 
God thy glory." 1 Chronicles xxix. 11 : "Thine, O Lord, is the 
greatness, and the power, and the glory." Psalm xxix. 3 : "The 
voice of the Lord is upon the waters : the God of glory thunders." 
Psalm lxxix. 9 : "Help us, O God of our salvation, for the glory 
of thy name." Romans i. 23: "And changed the glory of the 
incorruptible God into an image made like to corruptible man." 
Secondly, of power. 1 Chronicles xxix. 11 : "Thine, O Lord, is 
the greatness, and the power, and glory." Jeremiah xxxii. 17 : 
"Ah ! Lord God, behold thou hast made the earth and the heavens 
by thy great power, and stretched-out arm ; and there is nothing 
too hard for thee." Deuteronomy iv. 37 : "And because he loved 
thy fathers, therefore he chose their seed after them, and brought 
them out in his sight with his mighty power." 2 Samuel xxii. 33 : 
"God is my strength and power." Job xxvi., commencing with 
the 7th verse to the end of the chapter: "He stretcheth out 
the north over the empty place, and hangeth the earth upon 
nothing. He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds ; and the 
cloud is not rent under them. He holdeth back the face of his 
throne, and spreadeth his cloud upon it. He hath compassed 
the waters with bounds, until the day and night come to an end. 
The pillars of heaven tremble, and are astonished at his reproof. 
He divideth the sea with his power, and by his understanding he 
smiteth through the proud. By his Spirit he hath garnished 
the heavens; his hand hath formed the crooked serpent. Lo, 
these are parts of his ways ! but how little a portion is heard of 
him ? But the thunder of his power who can understand ?" 

What is the Son? First, he is a personage of tabernacle. 
Lecture v. 2. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 51 

How do you prove it ? John xiv. 9, 10, 1 1 : " Jesus saith unto 
him, 'Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not 
known me, Philip ? He that hath seen me hath seen the Father ; 
and how sayest thou then, Show us the Father ? Believest thou 
not that I am in the Father, and the Father in me ? The words 
that I speak unto you I speak not of myself : but the Father that 
dwelleth in me he doeth the works. Believe me that I am in the 
Father and the Father in me/ " Secondly, — and being a per- 
sonage of tabernacle, was made or fashioned like unto man, or 
being in the form and likeness of man. Lecture v. 2. Philip- 
pians ii. 2-8: "Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ 
Jesus ; who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to 
be equal with God ; but made himself of no reputation, and took 
upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness 
of man, and being found in fashion as a man, he humbled him- 
self, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the 
cross. " Hebrews ii. 14, 16: "Forasmuch then as the children 
are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took 
part of the same. For verily he took not on him the nature of 
angels: but he took on him the seed of Abraham/' Thirdly, he 
is also in the likeness of the personage of the Father. Lecture 
v. 2. Hebrews i. 1, 2, 3: "God, who at sundry times and in 
divers manners, spake in times past to the fathers, by the 
prophets, hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom 
he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the 
worlds ; who being the brightness of his glory, and the express 
image of his person/' Again, Philippians ii. 5, 6 : "Let this mind 
be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus ; who, being in the form 
of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God." 

Was it by the Father and the Son that all things were 
created and made that were created and made ? It was. Colossians 
i. 15, 16, 17: "Who is the image of the invisible God, the first 
born of every creature ; for by him were all things created that 
are in heaven and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether 
they be thrones or dominions, principalities or powers ; all things 
were created by him and for him ; and he is before all things, and 
by him all things consist." Genesis i. 1 : "In the beginning God 
created the heavens and the earth." Hebrews i. 2: (God) 
"Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath 
appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds." 

Does he possess the fullness of the Father? He does. 



52 LECTURES ON FAITH 

Colossians i. 19, ii. 9: "For it pleased the Father that in him 
should all fullness dwell." "For in him dwelleth all the fullness 
of the Godhead bodily." Ephesians i. 23 : "Which is his (Christ's) 
body, the fullness of him that fills all in all." 

Why was he called the Son ? Because of the flesh. Luke 
i. 33 : "That holy thing which shall be born of thee, shall be called 
the Son of God." Matthew iii. 16, 17 : "And Jesus, when he was 
baptized, went up straightway out of the water, and lo, the 
heavens were opened unto him, and he (John) saw the Spirit of 
God descending like a dove and lighting upon him : and lo, a voice 
from heaven saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am 
well pleased.' " 

Was he ordained of the Father, from before the foundation 
of the world, to be a propitiation for the sins of all those who 
should believe on his name? He was. 1 Peter i. 18, 19, 20: 
"Forasmuch as ye know that ye were not redeemed with cor- 
ruptible things, as silver and gold, from your vain conversation, 
received by tradition from your fathers : but with the precious 
blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot ; 
who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, 
but was manifested in these last times for you." Revelations 
xiii. 8: "And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship him 
(the beast), whose names are not written in the book of life of 
the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world." 1 Corin- 
thians ii. 7 : "But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, even 
the hidden mystery, which God ordained before the world, unto 
our glory." 

Do the Father and the Son possess the same mind ? They 
do. John v. 30: "I (Christ) can of my own self do nothing: 
as I hear, I judge, and my judgment is just; because I seek not 
my own will, but the will of the Father who sent me." John vi. 
38: "For I (Christ) came down from heaven, not to do my own 
will, but the will of him that sent me." John x. 30: "I (Christ) 
and my Father are one." 

What is this mind? The Holy Spirit. John xv. 26 : "But 
when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from 
the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceeds from the 
Father, he shall testify of me (Christ)." Galatians iv. 6: "And 
because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son 
into your hearts." 



THE HOLY GHOST AND THE HOLY SPIRIT 53 

Do the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit constitute the God- 
head? They do. Lecture v. 2.* (See footnote.) 

Do the believers in Christ Jesus, through the gift of the 
Spirit, become one with the Father and the Son, as the Father 
and the Son are one ? They do. John xvii. 20, 21 : "Neither pray 
I for these (the apostles) alone, but for them also who shall 
believe on me through their word ; that they all may be one ; as 
thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in 
us, that the world may believe that thou hast sent me." 

Does the foregoing account of the Godhead lay a sure 
foundation for the exercise of faith in him unto life and salva- 
tion ? It does. 

How do you prove it? By the third paragraph of this 
lecture.* 



*Let the student commit these paragraphs to memory. 



(Note: — That which follows has been added only in this compilation 
and, of course, is no part of the Lectures on Faith as originally delivered in 
Kirtland.) Further light was revealed to the Prophet subsequent to the 
giving of these Lectures, as will be noted by the quotations following — 

A. We believe in God the Eternal Father, and in His Son 
Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. — Joseph Smith (See famous 
Wentworth letter, March 1, 1842, Documentary History of the 
Church, Vol. 4:540) 

B. The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible 
as man's; the Son also; but the Holy Ghost has not a body of 
flesh and bones, but is a personage of Spirit. Were it not so, 
the Holy Ghost could not dwell in us. April 2,1843, Doc. and 
Cov., Sec. 130:22. 



The Holy Ghost and Ihe Holy Spirit 

By Pres. Joseph F. Smith 

But the gift of the Holy Ghost, which bears record of the 
Father and the Son, which takes of the things of the Father and 
shows them unto man, which testifies of Jesus Christ, and of the 
ever-living God, the Father of Jesus Christ, and which bears 
witness of the truth-this Spirit, this intelligence is not given unto 
all men until they repent of their sins and come into a state of 



54 THE HOLY GHOST AND THE HOLY SPIRIT 

worthiness before the Lord. Then they receive it by the laying 
on of the hands of those who are authorized of God to bestow 
His blessings upon the heads of the children of men. The Spirit 
spoken of in that which I have read is that Spirit which will not 
cease to strive with the children of men until they are brought to 
the possession of the greater light and intelligence. Though a 
man may commit all manner of sin and blasphemy, if he has 
not received the testimony of the Holy Ghost he may be forgiven 
by repenting of his sins, humbling himself before the Lord, and 
obeying in sincerity the commandments of God. As it is stated 
here: "Every soul who forsaketh his sins and cometh unto me, 
and calleth on my name, and obeyeth my voice, and keepeth my 
commandments, shall see my face and know that I am." He shall 
be forgiven and receive the greater light: he will enter into a 
solemn covenant with God, into a compact with the Almighty, 
through the Only Begotten Son, whereby he becomes a son of 
God, an heir of God, and a joint heir with Jesus Christ. Then 
if he shall sin against the light and knowledge he has received, 
the light that was within him shall become darkness, and oh, how 
great will be that darkness! Then, and not till then, will this 
Spirit of Christ that lighteth every man that cometh into the 
world cease to strive with him, and he shall be left to his own 
destruction. 

This is in accordance with the doctrine of Christ, as it is 
revealed in the New Testament; it is in accordance with the 
word of God as it is revealed in the latter-day through the 
Prophet Joseph Smith. God will not condemn any man to utter 
destruction, neither shall any man be thrust down to hell irredeem- 
ably, until he has been brought to the possession of the greater 
light that comes through repentance and obedience to the laws 
and commandments of God; but if, after he has received light and 
knowledge, he shall sin against the light and will not repent, 
then, indeed, he becomes a lost soul, a son of perdition. 
© The question is often asked, is there any difference between 
the Spirit of the Lord and the Holy Ghost? The terms are 
frequently used synonymously. We often say the Spirit of God 
when we mean the Holy Ghost; we likewise say the Holy Ghost 
when we mean the Spirit of God. The Holy Ghost is a personage 
in the Godhead, and is not that which lighteth every man that 
comes into the world. It is the Spirit of God which proceeds 
through Christ to the world, that enlightens every man that comes 



THE HOLY GHOST AND THE HOLY SPIRIT 55 

into the world, and that strives with the children of men, and 
will continue to strive with them, until it brings them to a know- 
ledge of the truth and the possession of the greater light and 
testimony of the Holy Ghost. If, however, he receive that greater 
light, and then sin against it, the Spirit of God will cease to strive 
with him, and the Holy Ghost will wholly depart from him. Then 
will he persecute the truth; then will he seek the blood of the 
innocent; then will he not scruple at the commission of any crime; 
except so far as he may fear the penalties of the law, in conse- 
quence of the crime, upon himself. 

Improvement Era, Vol. 11:380-2 



In order that additional information may be available on 
the Godhead and the Holy Ghost, the following references are 
listed: — 

The Holy Ghost: 

Contributor: 2:70; 3:7; 4:256; -259; 6:301; 6:303; 6:410; 15:13. 
Improvement Era: 1:760; 3:116; 5:35; 5:474; 11:380-1-2; 6:629; 
12:393; 12:409; 12:389; 16:11; 17:706; 19:460; 20:39; 20:71; 
26:1149; 28:168. 

Times and Seasons: 2:430; 3:752; 3:823; 3:866; 3:890; 3:904; 
3:915; 3:955; 3:945; 4:23; 6:768. 

Journals of Discourses: 1:24; 1:50; 1:90; 1:240; 2:231; 3:183 

3:203; 4:20; 4:140; 4:189; 4:266; 5:179; 5:203; 6:5 

6:105; 6:95; 6:349; 7:118; 7:178; 7:266; 8:102; 8:44 
9:254; 12:34; 12:112. 

Liahona: 5:297; 5:354; 5:550; 5:1031; 5:1139; 5:1269; 6:176 
6:175; 6:482; 6:792; 6:957; 6:986; 7:203; 7:314; 7:668 
8:625-6; 9:711-2; 9:273; 9:691; 9:673; 9:689; 10:312; 10:564 
10:656; 11:178; 11:205; 11:191; 11:843; 12:670; 12:759 
13:51; 13:52; 13:35; 13:386; 13:597; 16:1195; 18:35; 18:4S2 
18:484; 20:1; 20:5; 21:300; 21:379. 

Documentary History of Church: 1:61.78; 1:163; 2:477; 3:379-80; 
4:555; 5:26; 6:261; 5:555; 6:58; 6:253. 

The Godhead 

Improvement Era: 4:463; 20:34; 23:97; 17:706; 1:754; 23:496; 

2:894; 2:833; 4:228; 17:706; 25:579. 
Liahona: 19:442; 20:442; 12:648; 7:41; 8:673; 7:41-42; 7:109. 
D. H. C: 5:426. 

Contributor: 4:214. 

J. D.: 6.1; 4:215,271; 5:331; 6:275; 6:95. 1:238; 12:68-9; 11:40-2; 

11:119-24; 11:268; 11:271; 26:18. 
Journal History, Feb. 18, 1855, pp. 1-2. 
Millennial Star, 9:135. 



56 THE HOLY GHOST AND THE HOLY SPIRIT 

For a masterful presentation of the Doctrines of the Holy 
Trinity and the Atonement, consult the Third, Fourth and Fifth 
Year Books of the Seventy's Course in Theology, written by Pres. 
B. H. Roberts, and entitled: The Doctrine of Deity, (3rd), The 
Atonement (4th), and Divine Immanence and the Holy Ghost, 
(5th). Also refer to: The Mormon Doctrine of Deity , this being 
the Roberts — Vander Donkt discussion on the Godhead. These 
represent the epitome of instruction on these important subjects. 
Nothing further need be said after reading these masterpieces. 



The true God exists both in time and in space, and has as much 
relation to them as man or any other being. He has extension, and 
form, and dimensions, as well as man. He occupies space ; has a body, 
parts and passions ; can go from place to place — can eat, drink, and talk, 
as well as man. Man resembles Him in the features and form of His 
body, and He does not differ materially in size. When He has been seen 
among men, He has been pronounced, even by the wicked, as one of 
their own species. So much did He look like man, that some supposed 
Him to be the carpenter's son. Like man, He had a Father ; and He was 
the "express image of the person of the Father." The two persons 
were as much T alike in form, in size, and in every other respect as fathers 
and sons are of the human race; indeed, the human race are "His off- 
spring," made in His likeness and image, /not after His moral image, 
but after the image of His person. /There is no such thing as moral 
image. Such an image cannot exist. Morality is a property of some 
being or substance. A property without a substance or being to which 
it app(_ : s inconceivable. A property can never have figure, shape, 

or imar v»y kind. Hence, a moral image never had an existence 

except ill the brains of modern idolators. — By Orson Pratt. The Kingdom 
of God, No. 2, p. 4, Liverpool, October 31, 1848. 



LECTURE SIXTH 

1. Having treated in the preceding lectures of the ideas, of 
the character, perfections, and attributes of God, we next proceed 
to treat of the knowledge which persons must have, that the 
course of life which they pursue is according to the will of God, 
in order that they may be enabled to exercise faith in him unto 
life and salvation. 

2. This knowledge supplies an important place in revealed 
religion ; for it was by reason of it that the ancients were enabled 
to endure as seeing him who is invisible. An actual knowledge 
to any person, that the course of life which he pursues is accord- 
ing to the will of God, is essentially necessary to enable him to 
have that confidence in God without which no person can obtain 
eternal life. It was this that enabled the ancient saints to endure 
all their afflictions and persecutions, and to take joyfully the 
spoiling of their goods, knowing (not believing merely) that 
they had a more enduring substance. Hebrews x. 34. 

3. Having the assurance that they were pursuing a course 
which was agreeable to the will of God, they were enabled to take, 
not only the spoiling of their goods, and the wasting of their sub- 
stance, joyfully, but also to suffer death in its most horrid forms ; 
knowing (not merely believing) that when this earthly house of 
their tabernacle was dissolved, they had a building of God, a 
house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 2 Corin- 
thians v. 1. 

4. Such was, and always will be, the situation of the saints 
of God, that unless they have an actual knowledge that the course 
they are pursuing is according to the will of God they will grow 
weary in their minds, and faint ; for such has been, and always 
will be, the opposition in the hearts o'f unbelievers and those that 
know not God against the pure and unadulterated religion of 
heaven (the only thing which insures eternal life), that they will 
persecute to the uttermost all that worship God according to his 
revelations, receive the truth in the love of it, and submit them- 
selves to be guided and directed by his will ; and drive them to 
such extremities that nothing short of an actual knowledge of 
their being the favorites of heaven, and of their having embraced 
the order of things which God has established for the redemption 
of man, will enable them to exercise that confidence in him, 



58 LECTURES ON FAITH 

necessary for them to overcome the world, and obtain that 
crown of glory which is laid up for them that fear God. 

5. For a man to lay down his all, his character and reputa- 
tion, his honor, and applause, his good name among men, his 
houses, his lands, his brothers and sisters, his wife and children, 
and even his own life also — counting all things but filth and 
dross for the excellency of the knowledge of Jesus Christ — 
requires more than mere belief or supposition that he is doing 
the will of God ; but actual knowledge, realizing that, when these 
sufferings are ended, he will enter into eternal rest, and be a 
partaker of the glory of God. 

6. For unless a person does know that he is walking accord- 
ing to the will of God, it would be offering an insult to the 
dignity of the Creator were he to say that he would be a partaker 
of his glory when he should be done with the things of this life. 
But when he has this knowledge, and most assuredly knows that 
he is doing the will of God, his confidence can be equally strong 
that he will be a partaker of the glory of God. 

J^>7. Let us here observe, that a religion that does not require 
the sacrifice of all things never has power sufficient to produce 
the faith necessary unto life and salvation; for, from the first 
existence of man, the faith necessary unto the enjoyment of life 
and salvation never could be obtained without the sacrifice of all 
earthly things. It was through this sacrifice, and this only, that 
God has ordained that men should enjoy eternal life; and it is 
through the medium of the sacrifice of all earthly things that 
men do actually know that they are doing the things that are well 
pleasing in the sight of God. When a man has offered in sacri- 
fice all that he has for the truth's sake, not even withholding his 
life, and believing before God that he has been called to make 
this sacrifice because he seeks to do his will, he does know, most 
assuredly, that God does and will accept his sacrifice and offering, 
and that he has not, nor will not seek his face in vain. Under 
these circumstances, then, he can obtain the faith necessary for 
him to lay hold on eternal life. 

8. It is in vain for persons to fancy to themselves that 
they are heirs with those, or can be heirs with them, who have 
offered their all in sacrifice, and by this means obtain faith in 
God and favor with him so as to obtain eternal life, unless they, 
in like manner, offer unto him the same sacrifice, and through that 
offering obtain the knowledge that they are accepted of him. 



LECTURES ON FAITH 59 

9. It was in offering sacrifices that Abel, the first martyr, 
obtained knowledge that he was accepted of God. And from 
the days of righteous Abel to the present time, the knowledge that 
men have that they are accepted in the sight of God is obtained 
by offering sacrifice. And in the last days, before the Lord comes, 
he is to gather together his saints who have made a covenant 
with him by sacrifice. Psalm 1 : 3, 4, 5 : "Our God shall come, 
and shall not keep silence : a fire shall devour before him, and it 
v shall be very tempestuous round about him. He shall call to the 
heavens from above, and to the earth, that he may judge his 
people. Gather my saints together unto me; those that have 
made a covenant with me by sacrifice. ,, 

10. Those, then, who make the sacrifice, will have the 
testimony that their course is pleasing in the sight of God ; and 
those who have this testimony will have faith to lay hold on 
eternal life, and will be enabled, through faith, to endure unto 
the end, and receive the crown that is laid up for them that love 
the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ. But those who do not 
make the sacrifice cannot enjoy this faith, because men are de- 
pendent upon this sacrifice in order to obtain this faith : there- 
fore, they cannot lay hold upon eternal life, because the revela- 
tions of God do not guarantee unto them the authority so to do, 
and without this guarantee faith could not exist. 

11. All the saints of whom we have account, in all the revela- 
tions of God which are extant, obtained the knowledge which 
they had of their acceptance in his sight through the sacrifice 
which they offered unto him ; and through the knowledge thus 
obtained their faith became sufficiently strong to lay hold upon 
the promise of eternal life, and to endure as seeing him who is 
invisible ; and were enabled, through faith, to combat the powers 
of darkness, contend against the wiles of the adversary, overcome 
the world, and obtain the end of their faith, even the salvation 
of their souls. 

12. But those who have not made this sacrifice to God do 
not know that the course which they pursue is well pleasing in his 
sight ; for whatever may be their belief or their opinion, it is a 
matter of doubt and uncertainty in their mind ; and where doubt 
and uncertainty are there faith is not, nor can it be. For doubt 
and faith do not exist in the same person at the same time ; so 
that persons whose minds are under doubts and fears cannot 
have unshaken confidence; and where unshaken confidence is 



60 LECTURES ON FAITH 

not there faith is weak ; and where faith is weak the persons will 
not be able to contend against all the opposition, tribulations, and 
afflictions which they will have to encounter in order to be heirs 
of God, and joint heirs with Christ Jesus ; and they will grow 
weary in their minds, and the adversary will have power over 
them and destroy them. 

This Lecture is so plain, and the facts set forth so self-evident that 
it is deemed unnecessary to form a catechism upon it : the student is, there- 
fore, instructed to commit the whole to memory. 



The Following Excerpt Is Not A Part of The Lectures On 

Faith 

There have been various species of idolatry in different ages of the 
world. The sun, moon, stars, beasts, crocodiles, frightful serpents, images 
of wood, of stone, and of brass, have been erected into gods, and wor- 
shipped by innumerable multitudes. But the system of idolatry, invented 
by modern Christianity, far surpasses in absurdity anything that we have 
ever heard of. One of the celebrated worshippers of this newly-discovered 
god, in his Physical Theory of Another Life, says, "A disembodied spirit, 
or, we would rather say, an unembodied spirit, or sheer mind, is 
NOWHERE. Place is a relation belonging to extension; and extension 
is a property of matter ; but that which is wholly abstracted from matter, 
and in speaking of which we deny that it has any property in common 
therewith, can in itself be subject to none of its conditions; and we 
might as well say of a pure spirit that it is hard, heavy, or red, or that 
it is a cubic foot in dimensions, as say that it is here or there. It is 
only in a popular and improper sense that any such affirmation is made 
concerning the Infinite Spirit, or that we speak of God as everywhere 
present. God is in every place in a sense, altogether incomprehensible 
by finite minds, inasmuch as his relation to space and extension is 
peculiar to infinitude. Using the terms as we use them of ourselves, 
God is not HERE OR THERE, any more than he exists NOW AND 
THEN." This species of idolatry, according to the foregoing quotation, 
approaches so near to Atheism, that no one can tell the difference. Reader, 
can you see the difference? A god "without a body!" A god "without 
parts!" A god that cannot be "here or there!" A god that is "no- 
where!" A god that canont exist "now and then!" A god that exists 
in NO TIME. A god that has no extension— no "parts"— no con- 

(Continued on page 69) 



LECTURE SEVENTH. 

1. In preceding lessons we treated of what faith was, and of 
the object on which it rested. Agreeable to our plan, we now 
proceed to speak of its effects. 

2. As we have seen in our former lectures that faith was 
the principle of action and of power in all intelligent beings, both 
in heaven and on earth, it will not be expected that we shall, in 
a lecture of this description, attempt to unfold all its effects; 
neither is it necessary to our purpose so to do, for it would 
embrace all things in heaven and on earth, and encompass all the 
creations of God, with all their endless varieties ; for no world 
has yet been framed that was not framed by faith, neither has 
there been an intelligent being on any of God's creations who 
did not get there by reason of faith as it existed in himself or in 
some other being ; nor has there been a change or a revolution in 
any of the creations of God, but it has been effected by faith; 
neither will there be a change or a revolution, unless it is effected 
in the same way, in any of the vast creations of the Almighty, 
for it is by faith that the Deity works. 

3. Let us here offer some explanation in relation to faith, 
that our meaning may be clearly comprehended. We ask, then, 
what are we to understand by a man's working by faith ? We 
answer — we understand that when a man works by faith he 
works by mental exertion instead of physical force. It is by 
words, instead of exerting his physical powers, with which every 
being works when he works by faith. God said, "Let there be 
light, and there was light." Joshua spake, and the great lights 
whcih God had created stood still. Elijah commanded, and the 
heavens were stayed for the space of three years and six months, 
so that it did not rain : he again commanded and the heavens gave 
forth rain. All this was done by faith. And the Savior says. 
"If you have faith as a grain of mustard seed, say to this 
mountain, 'Remove/ and it will remove ; or say to that sycamine 
tree, 'Be ye plucked up, and planted in the midst of the sea/ and 
it shall obey you." Faith, then, works by words ; and with these 
its mightiest works have been, and will be, performed. 

4. It surely will not be required of us to prove that this is 
the principle upon which all eternity has acted and will act ; for 
every reflecting mind must know that it is by reason of this power 



62 LECTURES ON FAITH 

that all the hosts of heaven perform their works of wonder, 
majesty, and glory. Angels move from place to place by virtue 
of this power; it is by reason of it that they are enabled to 
descend from heaven to earth ; and were it not for the power of 
faith they never could be ministering spirits to them who should 
be heirs of salvation, neither could they act as heavenly messen- 
gers, for they would be destitute of the power necessary to enable 
them to do the will of God. 

5. It is only necessary for us to say that the whole visible 
creation, as it now exists, is the effect of faith. It was faith by 
which it was framed, and it is by the power of faith that it con- 
tinues in its organized form, and by which the planets move round 
their orbits and sparkle forth their glory. So, then, faith is truly 
the first principle in the science of theology, and, when under- 
stood, leads the mind back to the beginning, and carries it forward 
to the end ; or, in other words, from eternity to eternity. 

6. As faith, then, is the principle by which the heavenly 
hosts perform their works, and by which they enjoy all their 
felicity, we might expect to find it set forth in a revelation from 
God as the principle upon which his creatures here below must 
act in order to obtain the felicities enjoyed by the saints in the 
eternal world ; and that, when God would undertake to raise up 
men for the enjoyment of himself, he would teach them the 
necessity of living by faith, and the impossibility there was of 
their enjoying the blessedness of eternity without it, seeing that 
all the blessings of eternity are the effects of faith. 

7. Therefore it is said, and appropriately too, that "Without 
faith it is impossible to please God." If it should be asked — 
Why is it impossible to please God without faith ? The answer 
would be — Because without faith it is impossible for men to be 
saved; and as God desires the salvation of men, he must, of 
course, desire that they should have faith ; and he could not be 
pleased unless they had, or else he could be pleased with their 
destruction. 

8. From this we learn that the many exhortations which 
have been given by inspired men, to those who had received the 
word of the Lord to have faith in him, were not mere common- 
place matters, but were "for the best of all reasons, and that was — 
because without it there was no salvation, neither in this world 
nor in that which is to come. When men begin to live by faith 
they begin to draw near to God ; and when faith is perfected they 



LECTURES ON FAITH 63 

are like him ; and because he is saved they are saved also ; for they 
will be in the same situation he is in, because they have come to 
him ; and when he appears they shall be like him, for they will 
see him as he is. 

9. As all the visible creation is an effect of faith, so is salva- 
tion also — we mean salvation in its most extensive latitude of 
interpretation, whether it is temporal or spiritual. In order to 
have this subject clearly set before the mind, let us ask what 
situation must a person be in in order to be saved? or what is 
the difference between a saved man and one who is not saved ? 
We answer, from what we have before seen of the heavenly 
worlds, they must be persons who can work by faith and who 
are able, by faith, to be ministering spirits to them who shall be 
heirs of salvation ; and they must have faith to enable them to act 
in the presence of the Lord, otherwise they cannot be saved. 
And what constitutes the real difference between a saved person 
and one not saved is — the difference in the degree of their faith 
— one's faith has become perfect enough to lay hold upon eternal 
life, and the other's has not. But to be a little more particular, 
let us ask — Where shall we find a prototype into whose likeness 
we may be assimilated, in order that we may be made partakers 
of life and salvation? or, in other words, where shall we find a 
saved being? for if we can find a saved being, we may ascertain 
without much difficulty what all others must be in order to be 
saved. We think that it will not be a matter of dispute, that two 
beings who are unlike each other cannot both be saved; for 
whatever constitutes the salvation of one will constitute the salva- 
tion of every creature which will be saved ; and if we find one 
saved being in all existence, we may see what all others must be, or 
else not be saved. We ask, then, where is the prototype ? or where 
is the saved being? We conclude, as to the answer of this 
question, there will be no dispute among those who believe the 
Bible, that it is Christ: all will agree in this, that he is the 
prototype or standard of salvation ; or, in other words, that he is 
a saved being. And if we should continue our interrogation, and 
ask how it is that he is saved? the answer would be — because 
he is a just and holy being ; and if he were anything different from 
what he is, he would not be saved ; for his salvation depends on 
his being precisely what he is and nothing else; for if it were 
possible for him to change, in the least degree, so sure he would 
fail of salvation and lose all his dominion, power, authority and 



64 LECTURES ON FAITH 

glory, which constitute salvation; for salvation consists in the 
glory, authority, majesty, power and dominion which Jehovah 
possesses and in nothing else ; and no being can possess it but 
himself or one like him. Thus says John, in his first epistle, 
third chapter, second and third verses: "Beloved, now are we 
the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be; 
but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him, for 
we shall see him as he is. And every man that hath this hope in 
him, purifieth himself, even as he is pure." Why purify them- 
selves as he is pure ? Because if they do not they cannot be like 
him. 

10. The Lord said unto Moses, Leviticus xix. 2: "Speak 
unto all the congregation of the children of Israel, and say unto 
them, 'Ye shall be holy : for I the Lord your God am holy/ " 
And Peter says, first epistle, i. 15, 16: "But as he which hath 
called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation ; 
because it is written, 'Be ye holy ; for I am holy/ " And the 
Saviour says, Matthew v. 48: "Be ye therefore perfect, even as 
your Father which is in heaven is perfect/ " If any should ask, 
why all these sayings ? the answer is to be found from what is 
before quoted from John's epistle, that when he (the Lord) shall 
appear, the saints will be like him ; and if they are not holy, as 
he is holy, and perfect, as he is perfect, they cannot be like him ; 
for no being can enjoy his glory without possessing his perfec- 
tions and holiness, no more than they could reign in his king- 
dom without his power. 

11. This clearly sets forth the propriety of the Saviour's 
saying, recorded in John's testimony, xiv. 12: "Verily, verily, 
I say unto you, he that believeth on me, the works that I do shall 
he do also ; and greater works than these shall he do, because I 
go unto my Father/' This taken in connection with some of 
the sayings in the Savior's prayer, recorded in the seventeenth 
chapter, gives great clearness to his expressions. He says in 
the 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24th verses: "Neither pray I for 
these alone, but for them also who shall believe on me through 
their words; that they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in 
me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us ; that the world 
may believe that thou hast sent me. And the glory which thou 
gavest me I have given them ; that they may be one, even as we 
are one : I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made per- 
fect in one ; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, 



LECTURES ON FAITH 65 

and hast loved them, as thou has loved me. Father, I will 
that they also whom thou has given me, be with me where I 
am ; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given 
me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world." 
12. All these sayings put together give as clear an account 
of the state of the glorified saints as language could give — the 
works that Jesus had done they were to do, and greater works 
than those which he had done among them should they do, and 
that because he went to the Father. He does not say that they 
should do these works in time ; but they should do greater works, 
because he went to the Father. He says in the 24th verse : 
"Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with 
me where I am ; that they may behold my glory/' These sayings, 
taken in connection, make it very plain that the greater works 
which those that believed on his name were to do were to be done 
in eternity, where he was going and where they should behold his 
glory. He had said, in another part of his prayer, that he desired 
of his Father that those who believed on him should be one in 
him, as he and the Father were one in each other. "Neither pray 
I for these (the apostles) alone, but for them also who shall 
believe on me through their words, that they all may be one" ; 
that is, they who believe on him through the apostles' words, as 
well as the apostles themselves, "that they all may be one, as 
thou, Father, are in me and I in thee ; that they also may be one 
in us." 

- 13. What language can be plainer than this? The Saviour 
surely intended to be understood by his disciples, and he so spake 
that they might understand him ; for he declares to his Father, 
in language, not to be easily mistaken, that he wanted his disciples, 
even all of them, to be as himself and the Father, for as he and 
the Father were one so they might be one with them. And 
what is said in the 22nd verse is calculated to more firmly estab- 
lish this belief ; if it needs anything to establish it. He says : 
"And the glory which thou gavest me, I have given them, that 
they may be one, even as we are one." As much as to say that 
unless they have the glory which the Father had given him they 
could not be one with them ; for he says he had given them the 
glory that the Father had given him that they might be one ; or 
• in other words, to make them one. 

14. This fills up the measure of information on this subject, 
I and shows most clearly that the Saviour wished his disciples to 



66 LECTURES ON FAITH 

understand that they were to be partakers with him in all things, 
not even his glory excepted. 

15. It is scarcely necessary here to observe what we have 
previously noticed, that the glory which the Father and the Son 
have is because they are just and holy beings ; and that if they 
were lacking in one attribute or perfection which they have, the 
glory which they have never could be enjoyed by them, for it 
requires them to be precisely what they are in order to enjoy it ; 
and if the Saviour gives this glory to any others, he must do it in 
the very way set forth in his prayer to his Father — by making 
them one with him as he and the Father are one. In so doing 
he would give them the glory which the Father has given him ; 
and when his disciples are made one with the Father and Son, 
as the Father and Son are one, who cannot see the propriety of 
the Saviour's saying — 'The works which I do, shall they do; 
and greater works than these shall they do, because I go to my 
Father.'' 

- 16. These teachings of the Saviour most clearly show unto 
us the nature of salvation, and what he proposed unto the human 
family when he proposed to save them — that he proposed to 
make them like unto himself, and he was like the Father, the 
great prototype of all saved beings ; and for any portion of the 
human family to be assimilated into their likeness is to be saved ; 
and to be unlike them is to be destroyed ; and on this hinge turns 
the door of salvation. 

17. Who cannot see, then, that salvation is the effect of 
faith? for, as we have previously observed, all the heavenly 
beings work by this principle ; and it is because they are able so 
to do that they are saved, for nothing but this could save them. 
And this is the lesson which the. God of heaven, by the mouth of 
his holy prophets, has been endeavoring to teach to the world. 
Hence we are told, that "Without faith it is impossible to please 
God" ; and that salvation is of faith, that it might be by grace, 
to the end the promise might be sure to all the seed. Romans 
iv. 16. And that Israel, who followed after the law of righteous- 
ness, has not attained to the law of righteousness. Wherefore? 
Because they sought it not by faith, but as it were by the works 
of the law ; for they stumbled at that stumbling stone. Romans 
ix. 32. And Jesus said unto the man who brought his son to 
him, to get the devil who tormented him cast out: "If thou 
canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth." 



LECTURES ON FAITH 67 

Mark ix. 23. These with a multitude of other scriptures which 
might be quoted plainly set forth the light in which the Saviour, 
as well as the Former-day Saints, viewed the plan of salvation! 
That it was a system of faith— it begins with faith, and continues 
by faith ; and every blessing which is obtained in relation to it is 
the effect of faith, whether it pertains to this life or that which 
is to come. To this all the revelations of God bear witness. If 
there were children of promise, they were the effects of faith, 
not even the Saviour of the world excepted. "Blessed is she that 
believed," said Elizabeth to Mary, when she went to visit her, 
"for there shall be a performance of those things which were 
told her from the Lord." Luke i. 45. Nor was the birth of 
John the Baptist the less a matter of faith ; for in order that his 
father Zacharias might believe he was struck dumb. And through 
the whole history of the scheme of life and salvation, it is a matter 
of faith : every man received according to his faith— according as 
his faith was, so were his blessings and privileges ; and nothing 
was withheld from him when his faith was sufficient to receive 
it. He could stop the mouths of lions, quench the violence of fire 
escape the edge of the sword, wax valiant in fight, and put to 
flight the armies of the aliens; women could, by their faith, 
receive their dead children to life again ; in a word, there was 
nothing impossible with them who had faith. All things were 
in subjection to the Former-day Saints, according as their faith 
was. By their faith they could obtain heavenly visions, the 
ministering of angels, have knowledge of the spirits of just' men 
made perfect, of the general assembly and church of the first 
born, whose names are written in heaven, of God the judge of all, 
of Jesus the Mediator of the new covenant, and become familiar 
with the third heavens, see and hear things which were not only 
unutterable, but were unlawful to utter. Peter, in view of the 
power of faith, second epistle, first chapter, second and third 
verses, says to the Former-day Saints : "Grace and peace be 
multiplied unto you, through the knowledge of God, and of Jesus 
our Lord, according as his divine power hath given unto us all 
things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge 
of him that hath called us to glory and virtue." In the first 
epistle, first chapter, third, fourth and fifth verses he says: 
'Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which, 
according to his abundant mercy, hath begotten us again unto a 
lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to 



68 LECTURES ON FAITH 

an inheritance incorruptible and undented, and that fadeth not 
away, reserved in heaven for you, who are kept by the power of 
God through faith unto salvation, ready to be revealed in the 
last time." 

18. These sayings put together show the apostle's views most 
clearly so as to admit of no mistake on the mind of any indi- 
vidual. He says that all things that pertain to life and godliness 
were given unto them through the knowledge of God and our 
Saviour Jesus Christ. And if the question is asked, how were 
they to obtain the knowledge of God? (for there is a great dif- 
ference between believing in God and knowing him— knowledge 
implies more than faith. And notice, that all things that pertain 
to life and godliness were given through the knowledge of God) 
the answer is given— through faith they were to obtain this 
knowledge ; and, having power by faith to obtain the knowledge 
of God, they could with it obtain all other things which pertain 
to life and godliness. 

19 By these sayings of the apostle, we learn that it was by 
obtaining a knowledge of God that men got the knowledge of all 
things which pertain to life and godliness, and this knowledge 
was the effect of faith ; so that all things which pertain to life 
and godliness are the effects of faith. 

20 From this we may extend as far as any circumstances 
may require, whether on earth or in heaven, and we will find it 
the testimony of all inspired men, or heavenly messengers that 
all things that pertain to life and godliness are the effects of 
faith and nothing else; all learning, wisdom and prudence fail, 
and every thing else as a means of salvation but faith, ihis is 
the reason that the fishermen of Galilee could teach the world— 
because they sought by faith, and by faith obtained And this is 
the reason that Paul counted all things but filth and dross— what 
he formerly called his gain he called his loss ; yea, and he counted 
all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ 
Jesus the Lord. Philippians Hi. 7, 8, 9, and 10. Because to ob- 
tain the faith by which he could enjoy the knowledge of Christ 
Tesus the Lord, he had to suffer the loss of all things This is the 
reason that the Former-day Saints knew more, and understood 
more, of heaven and of heavenly things than all others beside, 
because this information is the effect of faith— to be obtained by 
no other means. And this is the reason that men as soon as the) 
lose their faith, run into strifes, contentions, darkness, and dinr 



LECTURES ON FAITH 69 

culties ; for the knowledge which tends to life disappears with 
faith, but returns when faith returns ; for when faith comes it 
brings its train of attendants with it — apostles, prophets, evan- 
gelists, pastors, teachers, gifts, wisdom, knowledge, miracles, 
healings, tongues, interpretation of tongues, etc. All these ap- 
pear when faith appears on the earth, and disappear when it 
disappears from the earth ; for these are the effects of faith, and 
always have attended, and always will, attend it. For where 
faith is, there will the knowledge of God be also, with all things 
which pertain thereto — revelations, visions, and dreams, as well 
as every necessary thing, in order that the possessors of faith 
may be perfected, and obtain salvation; for God must change, 
otherwise faith will prevail with him. And he who possesses it 
will, through it, obtain all necessary knowledge and wisdom, 
until he shall know God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, whom he 
has sent — whom to know is eternal life. Amen. 



(Continued from page 60) 
ceivable relation to TIME OR SPACE! O, blush for modern Christi- 
anity! — a pious name for Atheism! Some, perhaps, may think that I 
have not sufficient charity. But why should I have charity for a god 
that has no "parts" — no relation to space? Let him first have charity 
for himself. But this would be impossible; for he is a god "without 
passions." He can have no charity nor love for himself nor any one else. 
There is no danger of offending him; for a passionless god is not 
capable of anger. One of the persons of this imaginary god is said to 
have been crucified. But this must be a sad mistake ; for it would be 
impossible to crucify a portion of something that had no "parts." The 
reason, then, why the people have not received any word from the 
Great King, is because they have petitioned the wrong god. Would you 
expect her majesty, the queen of England, to answer your petition if it 
were directed to some African prince? Would you expect the God of 
heaven to answer a petition that was addressed to a Hindoo god? If, 
then, your petitions are addressed to the bodiless, passionless god of 
modern Christianity, you must not be surprised if the true God does not 
pay any attention to them. You need not expect that the True God will 
make any reply to petitions offered to any other being. — By Orson Pratt, 
The Kingdom of God, No. 2, pp. 3-4, Liverpool, Oct. 31, 1848. 



TRUE FAITH 

BY 

ORSON PRATT 

FAITH THE RESULT OF EVIDENCE — JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH WITH- 
OUT WORKS — JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH WITH WORKS — FAITH 
THE GIFT OF GOD — MIRACULOUS SIGNS ACCOMPANY TRUE FAITH 
IN ALL AGES — WHEN THE SIGNS CEASE, FAITH AND SALVA- 
TION CEASE. 

""1. — It is the intention of the author in this chapter to define 
and simplify the great principle, called FAITH. This is not an 
abstract principle, separate and distinct from mind, but it is a 
certain condition or state of the mind itself. When the mind be- 
lieves or has confidence in any subject, or statement, or propo- > 
sition, whether correct or incorrect, it is then in possession of 
faith. To have faith is simply to believe. Faith and belief, there- 
fore, are synonymous terms, expressive of the same idea. 
- 2. — Faith or belief is the result of evidence presented to the 
mind. Without evidence, the mind cannot have faith in anything. 
We believe that a stone will fall, when unsupported, on the evi- 
dence of past observation in relation to the falling of heavy bodies. 
We believe that day and night will continue on the evidence of 
past experience in regard to the uniformity of nature's laws. We 
believe that space is boundless, and duration endless, on the evi- 
dence, presented by the mind itself, which at once perceives the 
absurdity of either space or duration being limited. We believe 
in all self-evident truths, on the evidence that all opposite propo- 
sitions to these truths are absurd.* We believe in all the great truths 
of science, either on the evidences of our own investigations, or on 
the researches of others. We believe in historical facts on the 
evidence of the historian. Faith in every fact, statement, truth, 
or proposition which we have confidence in, is, in all cases what- 
soever, derived from evidence. Therefore, without evidence, faith 
can have no existence. 

3. — Faith is of two kinds, namely false and true. A false faith is 
the result of giving credence to false evidence: a true faith, the 
result derived from true evidence. 

4. — The faith of Cain in offering the fruits of the ground was 



TRUE FAITH 71 

false, derived from some incorrect evidence, in relation to offerings, 
or in relation to the conduct necessary to obtain a blessing. The 
faith of Abel in offering the firstlings of his flock, was founded 
upon the evidence he had from the word of God that such an 
offering would please Him. The faith of the Egyptians in the 
doctrines of the magicians was the result of false evidence, strength- 
ened, and as they supposed, confirmed by the numerous miracles 
wrought by their evil hands. The faith of Israel in the doctrines 
of Moses was founded upon true evidence, and hence, was pleas- 
ing in the sight of God. Faith in idols and in the mythologies of 
the heathen, is the result of a false traditionary evidence. Faith in 
the true God is founded upon true evidence. Faith in false doc- 
trines, and in the creeds and articles of religion, invented by 
human wisdom, is the production of traditionary evidence, not to 
be depended on. Faith in every word of God, whether ancient or 
depended on. Faith in every word of God, whether ancient or 
modern, is always produced by evidence that is true, and cal- 
culated to give the greatest assurance to the mind. 

5. — As evidence precedes faith, the latter should be weak or 
strong in proportion to the weakness or strength of the evidence. 
Where the evidence is accompanied by circumstances of a doubt- 
ful nature; or where it relates to things which are, in some degree, 
improbable in themselves; or where there is an opposing evidence 
of nearly the same influence or weight; or where there in only 
circumstantial evidence — faith should be weak. On the other 
hand, where the evidences are direct; where they relate to events 
or things, not improbable; where they are accompanied by fa- 
vourable circumstances of a confirmatory nature; where no evi- 
dences, of any influence or weight, are in opposition — faith should 
be strong.* The weakness, or„ strength of faith will, therefore, in 
all cases, be in proportion to the weakness or strength of the im- 
{^e^sipns^_prpduce(L ujJon Jhemin^d by_evidence. It is often the 
case, that the judg ment becomes s ojweak and beclouded, that the 
evidences, however great, and clear, and lucid, and demonstrative, 
produces no sensible impression upon the mind. Hence, faith 
does not always exist in impaired or vitiated minds with a strength 
proportioned to the degree or force of evidence. 

6. — In our examination into the truth or falsehood of many 
subjects, we are exceedingly liable to be deceived. Man, through 
the influence of sophistry, or popularity, or surrounding circum- 
stances or tradition, or many causes, combined, may be biased in 



72 TRUE FAITH 

his judgment, partial in his investigations, and swayed from that 
searching analysis which is sometimes requisite in order to dis- 
cover the truth or error of the subject, statement, or proposition, 
under consideration. Even his own senses, uncorrected, by his judg- 
ment, often lead him astray. For instance; a man, looking 
through the cabin window of a vessel, perceives another vessel 
apparently moving. He hastily concludes that the other vessel is 
really in motion, while his own is standing still. In this, he is 
very liable to be deceived; for the fact may be directly opposite to 
the one he so hastily assumes; that is, his own vessel may be 
moving, though imperceptibly to him, while the one at the dis- 
tance may be standing still; or the phenomenon may be occasioned, 
by the combined motion of both vessels. All the inhabitants of 
our globe were for many centuries, deceived in regard to the mo- 
tions of the heavenly bodies. They believed that the sun, moon, 
planets, and stars, revolved around the earth daily, until Coper- 
nicus undeceived them by proving that the appearances were the 
result of the simple diurnal rotation of the earth. 

7. — Very many have been the deceptions palmed upon the 
world, under the names of science, theories, hypotheses, doctrines, 
&c. Hundreds of millions in all ages have been under the in- 
fluence of false faiths, built upon false evidences. Among all the 
antediluvian world in the days of the flood, only eight persons 
had the true faith; all the rest perished with a false faith. In the 
cities of the plains which were overthrown. Lot and his two 
daughters were the only ones, having a true faith. Modern Christ- 
endom or the nations of great Babylon, have, for centuries, been 
under the influence of false faiths which will soon lead them to 
utter destruction. 

8. — A false faith in regard to history, science, and many other 
subjects, is not so injurious to individuals and nations, as an in- 
correct faith in regard to the doctrine of salvation. To believe 
that a revelation or message, sent from God, is false, is attended 
with the most fearful consequences, involving the present and 
future happiness of the soul. So likewise, to believe human creeds 
and articles of religion, invented by uninspired men, to be of 
divine origin, is equally dangerous and fatal in its consequences. 

9. — Faith most generally inspires the heart _t o_ ac tions or work s 
o f a nature similar and suitable to the belief. Faith in idolatrous 
systems leads to idolatrous works. Faith in false doctrines leads 
to false or wicked practices. Faith in the corrupt man-made 



TRUE FAITH 73 

systems of modern Christianity leads to many corrupt, abominable, 
and wicked works. Faith in a divine message or new revelation 
will lea A-to works in accordance with the requirements contained 
therein. Cjhj 

10. — Wnen faith n either true or false ? is sufficiently powerful to 
lead to aqtiQn r it produces effect^ pfiarar.tp.risfip nf thp r fliisP The 
faith of Paul, that Jesus of Nazareth was an imposter, led him to 
persecute his followers with great zeal. Afterwards his faith that 
Jesus was the son of God, led him to endure all kinds of hardships 
for his sake. The faith of some led them to really suppose they 
were doing God service to kill the Apostles. The faith of others 
made them willing to die for their testimony concerning Jesus. 
The murderers of the Apostles, and the Apostles themselves, both 
had faith and works; both were sincere; the one having the false 
faith and wicked works; the other having true faith and righteous 
works. 

1 1 . — Faith alone will not save men : neither will faith and wor ks 
s ave them, unless they are of the right kind. Indeed the faith 
and works of the greatest portion of mankind will be the very 
cause of their damnation. True faith and righteous works are es- 
sential to salvation; and without both of these, no man ever was, 
or^er can be saved. 

M^-Unless the true principles of salvation be revealed and es 
tablished by sufficient evidence, there could be no true faith and 
works by which mankind could obtain salvation ; for in the system 
of salvation, works follow faith, and faith follows evidence and 
evidence accompanies the revealed truth. For instance, God reveals 
the great and sublime truths contained in the Book of Mormon. 
Next, He sends evidence sufficient to convince mankind of the I 
divine authenticity of these truths. Thirdly, this evidence pro- I 
duces faith in the minds of those who candidly and carefully ex- 
amine it. Fourthly, this faith will lead the honest to do the works 
required of them in that book. And lastly, through the atonement 
of Christ, these faith and works, combined together, will surely 
save ihem in the kingdom of God ^ . — ■ 

lJ^j^/The evidence which God always gives to establish the di- 
vinity of His revelations, is sufficient to produce faith in the heart 
of every person living, who examines it in a proper manner^ 
Hence every creature in all the world, who has come to years of 
understanding, and who has evidence placed within his reach, is 
condemned if he does not believe it. There are some who say 



74 TRUE FAITH 

that, if the evidence were sufficient, they would be compelled to 
believe; but this is not true — the evidence may be sufficient, and 
yet they may refuse to examine it; or they may examine it with 
prejudiced minds, or they may be careless in their examinations, 
irrthey may refuse to examine it in the manner in which God has 
directed; or they may examine it with a determination not to em- 
brace it, even though it be true; or they may be partial in weigh- 
ing the evidence for, and apparently against it, with a most 
anxious desire and hope that they shall find it false. All these 
obstacles, and many others that might be named, prevent them 
from believing that which an honest, candid, unprejudiced, and 
prayerful mind would believe. Therefore it is not for the lack 
of evidence that they disbelieve, but it isi their own evil hearts, 
and the darkness which they bring with them in their investiga- 
tion. When God reveals a truth, as it is always accompanied with 
sufficient evidence, all people, because of their agency, can believe 
or disbelieve it, as they choose: and if they believe it, they can 
also obey or disobey it, as they choose: and herein is the con- 
demnation of man, because they prefer unbelief to faith, and dis- 
obedience to obedien ce. J 

14. — When the Apostles were commanded to go into all the 
world and preach the Gospel to every creature, they were informed 
that he who believed the Gosipel, and was baptized, should be 
saved, and he who believed not should be damned. To believe 
the Gospel, as the Apostles preached it, was not sufficient, but 
Jesus added the condition of baptism, clearly showing that their 
faith must be manifested by the works, otherwise it would be of 
no benefit to them. Jesus very well understood that the works 
necessary to salvation never would be performed without faith, 
which always precedes them ; and, as this faith was in their power 
to obtain through the evidence offered by the preaching of his 
Apostles, he determined to damn every creature in all the world 
that would not believe the message they taught. 

15. — There are some who believe that faith alone, unaccompan- 
ied by works, is sufficient for justification, sanctification, and sal- 
vation. But what would it benefit a hungry man, in a field, who 
believes that in the house there is a table spread for him with an 
abundance of food, if he make no exertion to approach the house 
and obtain the blessing? What profit would it be to a rich man 
who has faith in the words of Jesus, concerning the feeding of 
the hungry and the clothing of the naked, unless he have works 



TRUE FAITH ; 



STX^^^^/t"^ T Uld be Gained 
them? It f s not The person th ' ha \ S P° ken ' UnIess we do 
of Christ, that is justffieT b^ > "T^ ^T* in the sa y™gs 
obeying them. wCj esu ^pL k V% K T^° ^ his faith £ 
most generally, to those whoT? *? ' of beI r ers ' he has reference, 
to leal them £ oL^^.^^^.f^Ujr^ 
refers m the following passages • 'VfrL % believers that He 
he that heareth my words ™f ty .u 7 ' ™ nIy ' * sa y unt o you, 
everlasting life, and shall not com" il " ^j** "^ ™> hath 
passed from death unto life » «F«TrS ^^^on; but is 
he gave his only begotten Son fw u S ° l0Ved the wor,d , that 
should not perisUlt W S ^r iZ^^^ST* ? ^ 
on him is not condemned " Stlng llte ' He that believeth 

p£*£l!^*££^ °i h t evers Wh ° *""* fully 

be freed from ^S^^T^M^r 1 such a lone, should 
should become the cSen 7foH t P r ^° m death unto lit *~ 
lead them to obev All rZL I v hy haVmg a fai th that would 
without hopeTwiihou? ^riJSTS ^ ^n^ i Ustifi ^on- 
same as unbelievers ber«ni 1 g T and W,D be damned, the 
of thejon of G^^^J^ «- « *■ words' 

and my FaTher'^ll love Sm I°J ^ ^1, wi " kee P ™Y words; 
make our abode with him He £ T T" C ° me Unto him > and 

faith. ^ Jas ^^- 13ajil k£ted^ 

CW ito that Jesus is the 

which these words are contained riS ' ^ Wh ° le E P istIe in 

as really believing that Jesus was t^r^! "? *? be co ™dered 

Hereby we do know that we know hlT't' . he f Urther says, 
ments. He that saith, I Sow Z™ ' !* T kee , P his co ™mand- 
mandments, is a liar andthTtr^-^ a ? d 1 kee P e th not his com- 
his word, in him v?ril istXiVc ? **? Bu f whoso kee P e th 
that we are i n him.'' And aVain £ * P£ fected; h^eby know 
righteousness is born of ^^Hfe" 3 ^ ^ one that doeth 
ness is not of God." "He tK k~rST 6Ver doeth not "ghteous- 
- hm. and he in him^ "fet ttT^ ^ " 
and knoweth God." "He tfcutflLSfc f ° Veth I s born of God , 

ne that loveth not, knoweth not God; for 



76 TRUE FAITH 

God is love." "He that dwelleth in love, dwelleth in God, and 
God in him. Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have 
boldness in the day of judgment; because, as he is, so are we in 
this world. There is no fear in love, but perfect love casteth out 
fear; because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made 
perfect in love. We love him, because he first loved us." "This 
is the love of God, that we keep his commandments; and his com- 
mandments are not grievous." 

19. — From all these passages it is easy to perceive that salva- 
tion depends upon our loving God; and that loving God is the 
keeping of His commandments; and the keeping of His command- 
ments is the only sure evidence of our really believing that Jesus 
is the Christ. Let no persons, therefore, flatter or deceive them- 
selves with the idea that they believe from their heart, that Jesus 
is the Christ, or that they are born of God, or that they have 
passed from death unto life, or that they love God, unless they 
are certain that they have kept His commandments and sayings. 
Millions are deceiving themselves with a false faith and with a 
false hope — deluding themselves with the notion that they are 
born of God, when they have not attended even to the first com- 
mandments in relation to their adoption. All such will meet with 
a bitter disappointment. 

20. — The first effect of true faith is a sincere, true, and thorough 
repentance of all sins; the second effect is an immersion in water, 
for the remission of sins; the third is the reception of the ordi- 
nance of the laying on of the hands for the baptism of the Holy 
Ghost: these are the first commandments in the Gospel. No man 
has a saving faith without attending to these three requirements. 
No person can be a believer in Christ, in the scriptural sense of 
that term, without complying, in the strictest manner, with these 
commandments; without receiving these, it will be in vain for 
him to pray for a forgiveness of sins, or for the baptism of the 
Spirit, or for salvation: and if he flatters himself that he loves 
God, or that he can obtain eternal life without obeying these 
first commandments, he is woefully deceived. Indeed these are the 
introductory principles, and the only principles by which men and 
women can be born into the kingdom of Christ, and become his 
sons and daughters. After attending to these, there are other 
commandments for them to obey; but if they undertake to obey 
the others first, they will find their endeavors unacceptable in 
the sight of God. For instance, God requires His sons and daugh- 



TRUE FAITH 77 

ters to keep the Sabbath day holy; but no man can keep the 
Sabbath holy until he has attended to the first three command- 
ments of the Gospel, after which he can keep the Sabbath accord- 
ing to the mind of God, but not before. There are many com- 
mandments which none but those who are born of God can keep. 
And for a man to undertake to keep them before attending to the 
first three, would be like a child's undertaking to read before it 
had learned the alphabet. 

*21. — A faith, then, that brings remission of sins or justification 
to the sinner, is that which is connected with repentance and bap- 
tism. Faith alone will not justify; faith and baptism alone 
will not justify; but faith, repentance, and baptism will justify 
and bring remission of sins through the blood of Christ. What 
does Paul mean when he says, "Therefore being justified by 
faith, we have peace with God, through our Lord Jesus 
Christ?" He means that faith is the starting point — the 
foundation and cause of our repentance and baptism which bring 
remission or justification; and being the cause which leads to 
those results, it is not improper to impute justification to faith. 
What does that Scripture mean which says, "If thou shalt confess 
with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart 
that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. 
For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness, and with the 
mouth confession is made unto salvation?" It means that real faith 
in the heart is that which leads to obedience; for a man who does 
not obey, only has a degree of faith, and not living faith in the 
heart, which in all cases will lead to repentance, confession, bap- 
tism, laying on of hands, &c. All will admit that to believe with 
the heart leads to and includes repentance. Why not also admit 
that it includes every other commandment of the Gospel? Be- 
cause believng with the heart in the resurrection of Christ is the 
moving cause of obedience which brings salvation, it well may be 
said that salvation is the result of faith. 

22. — There has been much dispute among mankind in regard 
to justification. Some have supposed that we are justified by the 
blood of Christ by simple faith alone, without performing any 
works either of the law or Gospel. Others suppose that we are 
justified by the blood of Christ by simply adding repentance to 
our faith without any further works. Others contend that all 
mankind wjll be justified and saved through the blood of Christ, 
without either faith or works. All these admit that the atonement 



78 TRUE FAITH 

of Christ is necessary to justification. The only dispute seems to 
be in regard to the conditions required of the creature by which 
he receives the justification purchased by the atonement. Those 
who believe that simple faith alone, without works, is the only 
condition required, generally urge the following passages in 
support of that view; "For if Abraham were justified by works, 
he hath whereof to glory; but not before God. For what saith 
the Scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto 
him for righteousness. Now to him that worketh is the reward not 
reckoned of grace, but of debt. But to him that worketh not, but 
believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for 
righteousness. Even as David also describeth the man, unto whom 
God imputeth righteousness without works." (Rom. iv. 2-6) Those 
who believe works necessary to justification, quote the following: 
"What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he have faith, 
and have not works? Can faith save him? "Faith, if it hath 
not works, is dead, being alone. Yea, a man may say, Thou hast 
faith and I have works: show me thy faith without thy works, and 
I will show thee my faith by my works. Thou believest that there 
is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe and tremble. 
But wilt thou know, vain man, that faith without works is dead? 
Was not Abraham, our father, justified by works, when he had 
offered Isaac, his son upon the altar? Seest thou how faith 
wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect? 
And the Scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed 
God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was 
called the Friend of God. Ye see then how that by works a man 
is justified, and not by faith only. Likewise also was not Rahab, 
the harlot, justified by works, when she had received the messen- 
gers, and had sent them out another way? For as the body with- 
out the Spirit is dead, so faith without works, is dead also." 
(James ii. 14 — 26.) Paul and James seem apparently to con- 
tradict each other; and this has been the cause of differences of 
opinion in our day: but these apparent contradictions can easily 
be reconciled, if we take into consideration the two different sub- 
jects upon which they were writing. Paul was writing to a people 
who were inclined to believe in circumcision, and other works of 
the ancient law had been done away in Christ. And he shows 
clearly that circumcision and many of those ancient laws were 
given in the earlier ages, not to take away past sins, nor to justify 
those to whom they were given, but for various other purposes: 



TRUE FAITH 79 

and that by complying with those works, they did nothing more 
than what they were indebted to do, and that the reward attached 
to these acts was "not reckoned of grace, but of debt;" or, in 
other words, the reward of grace is a forgiveness of past sins; 
but the reward of debt is a freedom from the condemnation, not 
of past sins, but of the sins which would exist in the case we re- 
fused to pay the debt: for instance, God commanded Abraham 
to circumcise himself and all the males of his house, not to justify 
himself or his house of past sins, but for another purpose. When 
this commandment was given, it brought Abraham under obliga- 
tion to obey it; it was a debt he owed to the Lord; if he paid it, 
there would be no condemnations arising from disobedience in 
relation to that particular commandment, and he would have the 
reward of a clear conscience, so far as the payment of that par- 
ticular debt was concerned; but in all this there is no reward of 
grace manifested in the forgiveness of any sins which may have 
previously been committed. Therefore as obedience to these 
particular laws did not bring remission of sins, Paul could with 
propriety say that Abraham and others were not justified by 
works, that is, by such works of the law as circumcision, &c, 
which were given for a very different purpose than that of justi- 
fication . It was very necessary that Abraham should do those 
works, though they were not works intended to bring remission 
of sins or justification, yet the performance of them would pre- 
vent the sin of negligence, and would also bring such blessings 
as were attached to them by way of promise. But after these 
laws and circumcision were done away in Christ, then Paul could 
say, "But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that jus- 
tifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness." Jf_ 
those laws and ordinances which were given to Abraham to per- 
form, were not intended to justify him of his past sins, much less 
would they justify^ those who lived after Christ when they were 
donejaway. After Christ,lhese works given to Abraham to per- 
form, were not considered even as a debt binding upon any : they 
were works, therefore, that would be sinful to perform. The 
faith of that man that "worketh not," that is, that does not per- 
form works that are Hone away, "is counted for righteousness." 

23. — But as Abraham was justified by faith, it may not be im- 
proper to inquire whether there were any other class of works, 
connected with his faith, that were of a justifying nature. Paul 
says, "The Scripture foreseeing that God would justify the heath- 



80 TRUE FAITH 

en through faith, preached before the Gospel unto Abraham say- 
ing: In thee shall all nations be blest." — (Gal. iii. 8.) From this 
we learn that the same Gospel that was to justify the heathen 
through faith, and bless all nations, was actually preached to 
Abrham. Now in the Gospel there are certain works to be con- 
nected with faith for justification: by these works of the Gospel, 
he manifested his faith and obtained justification: and not by the 
works of the law, such as circumcision, &c. Paul says, "Faith 
was reckoned to Abraham for righteousness. How was it then reck- 
oned? when he was in circumcision or in uncircumcision? Not 
in circumcision, but in uncircumcision. And he received the 
sign of circumcision, a seal of the righteousness of the faith 
which he had, yet being uncircumcised: that he might be 
the father of all them that believe, though they be not circumcised: 
that righteousness might be imputed unto them also; and the 
father of circumcision to them who are not of the circumcision 
only, but who also walk in the steps of that faith of our father 
Abraham, which he had being yet uncircumcised. — (Rom.iv. 9 — 
12.) Fro m th ese passag es we l earn, that Abraham was justified 
before circumcision, consequently the GospeTof justification must 
hav e b een preached to him before that law was given. That 
there were works connected with the Gospel preached to Abra- 
ham, is evident from the fact that all the heathen nations who 
lived in the Apostles' days, could be justified and become his 
children by walking, as Paul says, "in the steps of that faith of 
our father Abraham." There were certain steps pertaining to the 
Gospel and faith of Abraham, in which he walked; otherwise 
he could not have been justified. Whatever works these steps 
of justification included, the very same were required of the 
heathen after Christ. These steps of the Gospel, since Christ, 
we have already observed, are Repentance and Baptism, which 
bring remission of sins and justification, being the results of 
faith, or, in other words, the steps of faith that Abraham walked 
in. Therefore, "to him that worketh not" the works of circum- 
cision and other laws that are done away, but performeth the 
works of the Gospel, "his faith is counted for righteousness," 
the same as Abraham's was, who walked in the steps of the same 
Gospel, and was justified in the same way. This view of the 
subject perfectly reconciles the teachings of both Paul and James, 
and shows most clearly that both were correct, when their state- 
ments are applied to the two different subjects upon which they 
were writing. 



TRUE FAITH 81 

24. — Faith is the gift of God. In what manner does God give 
faith? Does He impart this gift to the mind by the immediate 
operation of the Holy Spirit independent of any other means? 
Does He bestow it unsought for and irrespective of the prepara- 
tion of the mind? Does He confer it independent of the agency 
of man? To say that man obtains this gift without preparing 
himself, or without the exercise of any agency, is to deprive 
him of all responsibility in regard to whether he has faith or 
not. This condition would free him from all blame or 
condemnation for unbelief. If agency is in no way con- 
cerned in obtaining faith, it would be the highest act 
of injustice to punish the unbeliever: there would be no more 
responsibility about him than there is about the dumb brute. 
-What would be thought of the justice of a man who would pun- 
ish his horse because he was not harnessed? If the animal were 
endowed with the power of speech, would he not say that he was 
an irresponsible being, that he had no power or agency to harness 
himself, that the gift of harnessing belonged to a higher and 
superior being to himself, and that he considered it very cruel, 
and unjust, and tyrannical for that higher being to punish him 
for not exercising a faculty with which he was not endowed, 
which was far beyond his capacities, and which was a condition 
that man alone was capable of bestowing? If faith is the gift of 
God, and man has no agency in obtaining this gift, then he stands 
in the same relation to God in regard to having faith, as the 
horse does to the man in regard to being harnessed; and if it 
would be unjust and cruel in man to punish his horse for not 
being harnessed, it would be equally unjust and cruel for God to 
punish man for not having faith, if he be considered a being 
incapable of the exercise of such a faculty. 

25. — That faith is the gift of God there is no dispute; but that 
God bestows this gift unsought for, and without any prepara- 
tion or agency on the part of man, is not only unscriptural and 
unreasonable, but extremely absurd, when we consider that man 
is to be punished for his unbelief. But some may inquire, has 
not God the power and right to do with man as He pleases? Has 
not He power to withhold faith, and punish whomsoever He 
will, whether they deserve it or not? We reply that whatever power 
God has, it is certain that He will not exercise it contrary to 
the principles of Justice and Mercy, or contrary to the revealed 
character which He has given of Himself. If it were possible for 



82 TRUE FAITH 

Him to change or deviate from His word, then He would cease 
to be God. If He would punish the innocent and acquit the 
guilty, He would be a Being altogether unlovely and undesirable 
— a Being to be feared, but not to be loved. Therefore we may 
rest assured that He will never punish a man for his unbelief, 
unless man has the power to obtain faith through the exercise 
of his own free will. 

26. — But if faith cannot be obtained, unless sought for prop- 
erly, how can the sayings of Paul to the Ephesians be reconciled 
with this idea? "For by grace are ye saved through faith; and 
that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God; not of works, lest 
any man should boast. For we are His workmanship, created 
in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before or- 
dained that we should walk in them." — (Eph. ii. 8 — 10). We 
are to understand from these passages, that the grace and faith 
by which man is saved, are the gifts of God, having been pur- 
chased for him not by his own works, but by the blood of Christ. 
Had not these gifts been purchased for man, all exertions on his 
part would have been entirely unavailing and fruitless. Whatever 
course man might have pursued, he could not have atoned for 
one sin; it required the sacrifice of a sinless and pure Being in 
order to purchase the gifts of faith, repentance, and salvation 
for fallen man. Grace, Faith, Repentance, and Salvation, when 
considered in their origin, are not of man, neither by his works; 
man did not devise, originate, nor adopt them; superior Beings 
in Celestial abodes, provided these gifts, and revealed the con- 
ditions to man by which he might become a partaker of them. 
Therefore all boasting on the part of man is excluded. He is 
saved by a plan which his works did not originate — a plan of 
heaven, and not of earth. 

27. — Well might the Apostle declare to the Ephesians, that 
these gifts were not of themselves, neither of their works, when 
the God and Father of our spirits, from whom cometh every 
good and perfect gift, was the great Author of them. But are 
these great gifts bestowed on fallen man without his works? No: 
man has these gifts purchased for and offered to him; but before 
he can receive and enjoy them he must exercise his agency and 
accept of them: and herein is the condemnation of man, because 
when he was in a helpless fallen condition, and could not by 
his own works and devices atone for the least of his sins, the 
only Begotten of the Father gave his own life to purchase the 



TRUE FAITH 83 

gifts of faith and salvation for him, and yet he will not so much 
as accept of them. 

28. — Faith therefore is the gift of God, but man cannot have 
this choice heavenly treasure only in God's own appointed way. 
Among the means that God has ordained through which man 
may receive this great and precious gift, may be mentioned the 
preaching of the word by men called and inspired by the gift 
and power of the Holy Ghost: for saith the Apostle, "How then 
shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how 
shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? And how 
shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach 
except they be sent?" "So then, faith cometh by hearing, and 
hearing by the word of God." — (Rom. x. 14, 15, 17.) Though 
faith be the gift of God, yet it comes by hearing the word. 
Through this medium man makes himself acquainted with the 
evidence in favour of the divinity of the word; the evidence 
being of divine origin as well as the word. This evidence begets 
faith in the mind; and this faith, though it be obtained through 
the exercise of the free will and agency of the creature, is still 
the gift of God, granted through the evidence accompanying the 
preached word. In the Apostles' days, when the art of printing 
was unknown, and the great majority of mankind could not read 
the word, the principle means of obtaining faith was by the pro- 
cess of preaching and hearing, but in these days, in many in- 
stances, faith comes by reading as well as by preaching: for a 
man called and inspired of God can both preach and write by the 
power of the Holy Ghost, and when the honest humble soul either 
hears or reads that which is given by the Spirit, the light that 
is in him witnesseth that it is of God; for light cleaves to light, 
and truth_to truth;, the Spirit gives light to every man that comes 
into the world, and if he loves the light that is in himself, he will 
love all other light that is presented to his mind, and embrace it. 
Light cannot be presented to the mind of a candid, honest per- 
son, without being perceived to be light; but if he receive it not 
he extinguishe s in a d egree the lig ht that i sT in him, and darkness 
still greate r_ensue s, and he is left to commit evils of a greater 
ma gnitu de, until the light that was in him has entirely fled, and 
da rkness reigns tr iumphantly: this darkness brings misery and 
wretchedness in this world and eternal torment in the world to 
come. This is the state of man who rejects light and truth, and 
will not exercise faith in that which the light that is in him 
teaches him is truth. 



84 TRUE FAITH 

29. — The word and the evidence accompanying it are both the 
gifts of God; but besides these, the light that is in every man 
who comes into the world is also the gift of God through Christ. 
For if Christ had not purchased this gift for man by his atoning 
blood, man would have been destitute of all light. Darkness alone 
would have reigned, and our world would have been a hell — 
the miserable abode of fallen spirits and fallen man: no ray of 
light could have penetrated the darkened understanding: the ex- 
treme of misery would have been the result. But saith our Sa- 
viour, "I am the light and the life of the world;" all light that 
is in the world came by him through his atonement; it is the 
gift of God to fallen man. If the light that is in man be the 
gift of God, surely all additional light offered to him, must be 
the gift of God also. By faith man should lay hold of this light, 
wherever he may discover it. 

30. — The only w ayjo re ceive additional faith an d light is to 
pra ctise accordingto th e liffht which we hav e : and if we d o 
This, we ~have the promise o f G od that the sam e shall grow bright^ 
^r]myfT>righter iintiHheJ^eije ct day. Every ^vord ol^SodTslight 
and truths He that saith, that Tie is in the light, but obeyeth not 
me woms of truth, is deceiving himself, and is in darkness ; for 
none are the children of faith except such as walk in the light, 
and obey its laws. How many millions in Christendom profess 
to be Christians, and say that they are in the light and have been 
born of God, and yet they have never obeyed even the first prin- 
ciples of the light; they have never repented properly and been im- 
mersed in water for the remission of sins by the ministration 
of one whom God has authorized; and yet they pretend that 
God for Christ's sake has forgiven their sins. How blindly de- 
ceived! and how vain their faith and hope of salvation! God 
has not forgiven their sins; neither will He forgive them, until 
they obey the message of the Gospel according to the precise 
order which He has revealed. Faith is the gift of God, and is 
one of the means of salvation; but none can have this gift except 
in the way that God has ordained: and all who pretend to have 
faith and obey not that form of doctrine which God has revealed 
will find that their faith is of no effect, and that they will be 
damned with unbelievers: for God will not confer saving gifts 
upon the disobedient. 

31. — Every thing that is good comes from God and is the gift 
of God. God has given revelation upon revelation unto man 



TRUE FAITH 85 

for his benefit; and the generations to whom He has given His 
word will be judged by that word at the last day. God raised 
up a prophet in our day, and gave him the Urim and Thummim, 
and revealed a flood of light and truth through him to this genera- 
tion. This generation will be judged out of the books and revela- 
tions which God gave through this prophet. If they exercise faith in 
these revelations, and obey the same, they will be justified and 
saved; but if they disbelieve them, and harden their hearts against 
them, they will surely be damned; for the Almighty reveals not 
His word in vain. What doth it benefit this generation to offer 
them a heavenly gift, and reveal to them more light and truth 
if they receive it not? The gift benefits those only who receive 
it. The rest will receive a greater condemnation. When the 
honest read that heavenly treasure — the Book of Mormon, they 
are filled with joy unspeakable, because God has again spoken 
to man as in ancient times; their souls feast upon the contents 
of that holy and divine book; and so great is their joy, that they 
cannot find language adequate to express the overflowings of 
their hearts. But how different are the feelings of those who re- 
ject it; light and truth flee from them, and they feel angry to 
think that God should again speak to man. But God will show 
them by His Almighty power that His word cannot be rejected 
with impunity. The judgments that have befallen ancient gen- 
erations and nations who have rejected His word, ought to be 
a solemn warning to those now on the earth. But alas! the pride, 
high-mindedness, and great wickedness of man cause him to 
hate the light because his deeds are evil. And thus this genera- 
tion will, for the most part, perish in unbelief and disobedience 
to one of the greatest and most important messages that God 
ever sent for the salvation of the people. Oh, poor fallen man! 
how eager for happiness, and yet how unwilling to receive it upon 
righteous principles! Oh, that thou didst but know the day of 
thy visitation and wouldst incline thine ear and hearken to the 
voice of God and harden not thy heart for then it would be well 
with thee! But thou knowest not, neither dost thou consider the 
fearful judgments that await thee, if thou turnest a deaf ear to 
the last great message of mercy, now revealed from the heavens, 
for thy good! Oh, turn unto the Lord, and exercise faith in 
Him, that thy light and joy may be increased — thy faith and love 
become perfected, that all of the gifts of God may abound in 
thee, that thou mayest finally obtain eternal life, which is the 
greatest of all the gifts of God to man. 



86 TRUE FAITH 

32. — Without true and genuine faith it is impossible to please 
God; and Jesus expressly says, that "He that believeth not shall 
be damned." It is of the utmost importance, therefore, that every 
man examines himself in the most careful and rigid manner to see 
whether he be in the faith or not. The only sure and perfect 
standard with which to compare his faith is the word and Spirit 
of God. 

33. — Reader, are you sincerely desiring salvation, and do you 
wish to enter into a most thorough and searching examination 
of your faith? Are you willing to have your faith compared with 
and measured by the divine oracles? Are you a believer in the 
word of God? If so, you must be aware, that you are com- 
manded in the most emphatic terms, to repent of all your sins. 
This is the very first act required of a Bible believer. Have you 
repented sincerely, and humbly, and with all your heart? Have 
you confessed all your sins unto God with a broken heart and 
contrite spirit? Have you, not only confessed, but forsaken 
every sin? Have you made sufficient acknowledgement and sat- 
isfaction to those whom you may have in any way injured? Have 
you covenanted with and promised the Lord that you will sin 
no more? If you have not repented in this manner and reformed 
your conduct, then you are not a true believer; your faith is 
vain, and your hopes are vain, and you are yet in your sins, not 
having complied with even the very first requisition of faith. 

34. — But, if you have most sincerely repented and put away 
your evil deeds, then you have taken the first permanent step 
towards a true and saving faith. You are now humble and con- 
trite in your feeling; your heart is tender, and you feel grieved 
that you have ever sinned against God. You feel determined that 
henceforth you will reform. You are a believing penitent sinner; 
and your great desire is to obtain a pardon of your sins. You 
ask the Lord to forgive you, but He does not grant your request. 
You pray much, but still you have no evidence that your sins 
are forgiven. You go forward to be prayed for by your min- 
isters and friends, but find no relief. You become discouraged 
and perhaps fall back into sin, thinking that there is something 
wrong, or that there is no hope for you; or perhaps you may 
be persuaded by your minister that your sins are forgiven, and 
you try to fancy that it is so; though you have no certainty that 
you are pardoned, yet you hope that such is the case; this false 



TRUE FAITH 87 

hope causes you to be somewhat easy in your feelings and you 
fancy all is well. 

35. — But let me tell you plainly that you are deceiving your- 
self. Your sins are not forgiven. It is true, you have believed 
the word of God, and have repented; but repentance is only the 
firsc step towards obtaining forgiveness. You have another great 
step to take, before you can expect your sins to be pardoned. 
You must be immersed in water, by one having authority from 
God, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost, for the remission of your sins. Then, and not till then, 
your sins will be forgiven; for these are the two grand steps, 
to be joined with your faith, in order that your sins may be 
washed away, by the atoning blood of Christ. Faith, without 
repentance and baptism, will not bring you pardon; neither will 
repentance bring you forgiveness; neither will faith and repent- 
ance, both together, be sufficient to bring remission of sins; but 
Faith, Repentance, and Baptism, are sure to put you in possession 
of a complete justification of all past sins. 

36. — Faith leads you to repentance and to the waters of bap- 
tism for the remission of sins. Faith, connected with repentance 
alone, is not a justifying faith. In order to be justified by faith, 
Baptism as well as repentance must be coupled with faith; these 
three joined in one, constitute the Faith of Justification; where 
either is wanting, there justification does not exist, and the pen- 
ient believer is yet in his sins. 

37. — Are you, dear Reader, anxious that your sins should all 
be blotted out? If so, seek not to obtain this choice blessing, 
contrary to the Gospel; delude not yourself with the vain hope 
that you are already pardoned, when you have done nothing 
more than to repent. God will not accept your repentauce, unless 
you be baptized for the remission of your sins. Have you ever 
gone down into the water and been buried therein, as penitent 
believers did in ancient times? Have you ever buried the deeds 
of the old man in a watery grave, as the body of Christ was 
buried? Did you by such burial, become dead to sin, as Jesus 
became dead, as it regards his mortal body? Have you ever 
arisen from the watery tomb to newness of life, as Jesus arose 
from the tomb of mortality to immortality? Unless you have done 
this, both your faith and hope are vain. 

38. — Again, if you have been immersed by one whom God 
has not sent, and to whom God has not spoken and given author- 



88 TRUE FAITH 

ity to baptize; or if you have been baptized by any one who 
denies new revelation, and does away any of the miraculous gifts 
of the Gospel, and says, they are unnecessary in these days, then 
know assuredly, that your immersion is illegal, and will in no 
wise be accounted as baptism to you. Therefore your only hope 
of obtaining pardon will be, to search after one whom the Lord 
has truly authorized, and receive this sacred ordinance under 
his hands; and then your sins shall be forgiven you, and you 
will, so far as these first steps are concerned, have the true genu- 
ine Gospel faith. 

39. — You have now, by complying with repentance and bap- 
tism, been set free from all past sin. You have been born of the 
water, but not of the spirit Though justified, you yet lack a 
most essential and important blessing, namely, The Baptism of 
the Holy Ghost. 

40. — God hath ordained ordinances through which Gospel 
blessings are granted to believers. We have already stated, that 
the ordinance of Baptism when ministered by proper authority, 
is that through which pardon comes to the penitent believer; so 
likewise, God hath ordained the laying on of the hands of His 
authorized servants, as the sacred ordinance through which He 
will bestow upon baptized believers the Gift of the Holy Ghost. 

41. — The Baptism of the Holy Ghost cannot be dispensed with 
by the believer, any more than the baptism of water. To be born 
of the water, only justifies the sinner of past sins; but to be 
born, afterwards, of the Holy Ghost, sanctifies him and prepares 
him for spiritual blessings in this life, and for eternal life in the 
world to come. To be born of the water does not qualify him to 
enter into the kingdom of God, but to be born, first, of the water, 
and afterwards, of the spirit, fully qualifies him to enter and 
dwell in that kingdom. Jesus says, "Verily, verily, I say unto 
you, except a man be born of the water and of the spirit, he can 
in no wise enter into the kingdom of God." A man may believe, 
repent, and be immersed in water, or in other words, be born of 
water, and yet, according to the word of Jesus, he cannot enter 
into the kingdom of God, without also being born of the spirit. 

42. — The ordinance of the Laying on of Hands for the birth of 
the Spirit, is, therefore, essential to salvation. 

43. — The men and women of Samaria were born of the water 
several days before they were born of the spirit. Peter and 
John were under the necessity of performing a journey from 



TRUE FAITH 89 

Jerusalem to Samaria, to lay hands on the baptized believers of 
the latter city, that they might also be born of the spirit, even 
as they had been born of the water several days before. 

44. — The baptized believers at Ephesus were born of the spirit 
through the laying on of the hands of Paul. Paul also was born, 
first of the water to wash away his sins; (Acts xxii. 16,) and 
secondly, of the Spirit by the ministration of Ananias. (Acts ix. 
17, 18.) 

45. — Having by faith received forgiveness of sins, and the 
gift of the Holy Ghost, the believers begin with greater assurance 
to lay hold of every blessing promised in the Gospel. They read 
that certain miraculous signs shall be given to believers. (Mark 
xvi. 15, 18.) They consider that they have the right to enjoy 
these signs, according to the promise which Jesus made. And they 
soon find, that through faith, they, in the name of Jesus, can 
cast out devils, speak in new tongues, overcome deadly poisons, 
heal the sick, dream heavenly dreams, see open visions, prophesy 
of future events, receive revelations, control the powers of na- 
ture, and, in short, do anything that is necessary for their wel- 
fare and the glory of God. All these blessings are obtained by 
faith; and without faith no spiritual gifts can be received. 

46. — The gift of the Holy Ghost, with all its miraculous powers, 
is one of the great distinguishing differences between Gospel be- 
lievers and unbelievers. Jesus has been pleased to promise to 
the one class miraculous signs, and to the other damnation. All 
persons who wish to thoroughly examine their faith by the word 
of God, can at once determine to which of these two classes 
they belong. All who find themselves in possession of the signs, 
know of a surety that they are believers, and consequently sub- 
jects of salvation. But all who find themselves destitute of these 
signs, know at once, that they are unbelievers, and, therefore, 
subjects of damnation. 

47. — The nations of apostate Christendom are deceiving them- 
selves with the vain and foolish idea, that they are Gospel believ- 
ers, without the promised accompanying signs. They suppose 
that they have the true faith without enjoying the promised 
miraculous effects of that faith; thus they have been deluding 
themselves with a false faith, and unfounded hope, for some 
seventeen centuries past. Where faith exists, these miraculous 
signs exist. If the signs have ceased, then faith has ceased also. 



90 TRUE FAITH 

Without these signs, no church, either Catholic or Protestant, 
can be saved; for they are not believers. 

48. — Faith, though the gift of God, is not only obtained by the 
exercise of the agency of man, but is also increased and perfected 
by the same agency. Obedience to the ancient Gospel will nec- 
essarily impart the ancient Faith: and Faith will necessarily 
have the same power to prevail with God, in one age as in an- 
other. If, through Repentance, Baptism, and Laying on of 
Hands, in ancient times, Faith was so increased as to obtain Re- 
mission of Sins, the Gift of the Holy Ghost, and Miraculous 
Signs, why will not obedience, in this age, to the same three re- 
quirements, impart the same degree of Faith? And why not also 
the same three Gospel blessings, follow the same Faith? 

49. — Can any one show any reason, or present any evidence 
from the divine oracles, why obedience to the ancient Gospel 
will not give the same Faith now as in ancient times? Will not 
Repentance, in all ages, have the same moral effect upon the 
mind? Is not Gospel Baptism now the same as anciently? Is not 
every step of obedience to the Gospel the same now as ever? All 
Bible believers will, at once, answer, that every requirement of 
the Gospel is the same; and that all can still yield the same ac- 
ceptable obedience to each requirement; this being the case, does 
it not necessarily follow, that the same obedience will impart 
the same Faith; and still further, that the same Gospel Faith will 
bring the same Gospel blessings? Nothing is more certain. 

50. — The same Jesus that promised to the believer the Remis- 
sion of Sins, as a Gospel blessing, also promied to the same be- 
liever Miraculous Signs, as Gospel blessings. What authority 
has the Gospel believer to claim one Gospel blessing, and reject 
the others? Would not this be indirectly rejecting the whole 
Gospel? He that offends in one point of the law, is, by our 
Savior, represented as guilty of the transgression of the whole. 
He who Jias_no faith to obtain Gospel si gns, has no faith t o ob - 
tain^Gosp^ who would thus pervert the Gospel 

is most woefully deceived, if he supposes himself in possession 
of any Gospel blessing. Jesus has made no Gospel promises 
to be trifled with, or to be rejected with impunity by professed 
believers. 

51. — Faith in all ages, and under all dispensations, has always 
prevailed with God. By faith, signs, miracles, and manifestations 
of the power of God, were abundantly shown forth under the 



TRUE FAITH 91 

Patriarchal, Mosiac, and Christian dispensations, Jesus said, 
"All things are possible to him that believeth." — (Mark ix. 23-) 
Again he said, "Have faith in God, For verily I say unto you, 
That whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, 
and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, 
but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to 
pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith. Therefore I say unto 
you, what things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that 
ye receive them, and ye shall have them." — (Mark xi. 22, 23, 
24.) In another passage He said, "Verily, verily, I say unto you, 
He that believeth on me, the works that I do shall he do also; 
and greater works than these shall he do; because I go unto my 
Father."— (John xiv, 12.) 

52. — None of these passages limit the miraculous effects of 
Faith to the Apostles, or to any particular class of true believers, 
or to any particular age of the world. But on the contrary; each 
of these promises was made on the broadest terms, general and 
unlimited as to time or place. The terms, "He that believeth; 99 
"Whosoever shall say 99 &c, are applicable to all believers, in all 
ages, and in all the world, unto the latest generations, or to the 
end of time. No other Gospel blessings were more unlimited in 
their application. No other more positively and definitely ex- 
pressed. No other that we have any more right to claim or 
seek after by Faith. 

53. — Indeed, the miraculous gifts were to be the effects — the 
results — the signs of faith, by which the true believer could, by 
the most infallible evidence distinguish himself from an unbe- 
liever. By these gifts he is confirmed; and he obtains the most 
satisfactory knowledge and absolute certainty of the divinity of 
the doctrine which he has embraced. By these tokens, he knows 
that he is in reality a true genuine Gospel believer, that his sins 
are surely forgiven, and that he has received the gift of the Holy 
Spirit, and is, indeed, an heir of Salvation. 

54. — While on the other hand, without these gifts, he knows 
that he is not a believer — that he has no genuine gospel faith — 
that he has no claim to any of the other Gospel blessings — that 
he is classified with unbelievers, and with them he must be 
damned. 

55. — Jesus has made the contrast so great, and the distinguish- 
ing marks so apparent, between true and genuine Gospel be- 



92 TRUE FAITH 

lievers and unbelievers, that it is impossible for any man who 
examines his own faith by the word of God, to be deceived. 

56. — Reader, are you a believer or an unbeliever? Do signs 
follow you, according to the promise of Jesus in the last chapter 
of Mark? Have you ever cast out devils in the name of Jesus? 
Have you ever spoken with another tongue by the power of the 
Holy Ghost? Have you ever had faith to prevail against deadly 
poisons? Have you ever healed the sick in the name of Jesus, 
by the laying on of your hands? Have you ever obtained any of 
the promised miraculous gifts of the Spirit? If you have not, 
then you are not a Gospel believer, and are included in that 
class which Jesus says, shall be damned. Your condition is a 
fearful one indeed, without the true faith, without hope, without 
salvation, exposed to the wrath which must fall upon unbelievers, 

57. — Do you inquire what you must do? The answer is, be- 
come a Bible believer; forsake the false, corrupt, and powerless 
systems of uninspired men; follow not after any religion because 
of its popularity; but seek after the faith of the Saints, such as 
is so clearly defined in the Bible. Seek for the blessings enjoyed 
by all true believers in Christ; rest not satisfied until you are 
in possession of the signs of a believer; for know assuredly if 
you stop short of this, you can in no wise be saved. It is the word 
which God has spoken, and which He will not revoke. 

58. — Now, dear reader, we have plainly pointed out to you 
the nature of faith; we have proven to you that faith, like all 
other good things, is the gift of God to man; we have clearly 
shown you how to obtain a true and genuine Gospel faith; we 
have also told you how to examine your faith to know whether 
it be the right kind: we have referred you to the miraculous 
signs which Jesus says shall follow all believers throughout the 
world; we have proved that without these signs, there can be no 
believers, no faith, no Church of Christ, no salvation. And now 
we close this subject by telling you plainly, that God has again 
restored His Church to the earth, by revealing the Book of Mor- 
mon, containing the everlasting Gospel; by sending His angels 
as predicted by His servant John on Patmos; by restoring Apos- 
tles, and all other officers of the Priesthood; and by setting up 
His latter-day kingdom, as foretold by Daniel the prophet. 

59. — As many as have received this message with all their 
hearts, have been blessed with the signs promised to believers; 
and we know of a surety, and bear record that God is the same, 

/ 



SHEM WAS MELCHIZEDEK 93 

faith is the same, the Gospel is the same, and that all the mira- 
culous gifts thereof are the same, as in ancient days; and that 
the faithful Saints enjoy all blessings now, as in days of old. 

60. — Let me earnestly entreat you to break off all your sins, 
and to bow before your Father in Heaven, and ask Him, if what 
you have now read is true. If you will do this with a sincere and 
humble heart, God will manifest the truth of these things to you 
by the power of the Holy Ghost. 



Shem was Melchizedek 

From this definite account of driving the "nations apart, 
when the ancient hills did bow," all reflecting minds may judge 
that man was scattered over the whole face of the earth. And 
with the superior knowledge of men like Noah, Shem (who was 
Melchizedek) and Abraham, the father of the faithful, three 
cotemporaries, holding the keys of the highest order of the 
priesthood: connecting the creation, and fall; memorising the 
righteousness of Enoch; and glorying in the construction oi 
the ark for the salvation of a world; still retaining the model 
and pattern of that ark, than which a great, ah, we might say, 
half so great a vessel has never been built since; for another 
ark, be it remembered, with such a ponderous living freight will 
never be prepared as a vessel of mercy by command of Jehovah. 
Times and Seasons, Vol. 5, p. 746. 
Nauvoo, Illinois, December 15, 1844. Elder John Taylor, Editor.) 



The Faith of Melchizedek 

(From Inspired 'Translation" of Scriptures, by 
Joseph the Prophet) 

Now Melchizedek was a man of faith, who wrought right- 
eousness; and when a child he feared God, and stopped the mouths 
of lions, and quenched the violence of fire. 

And thus, having been approved of God. he was ordained 
an high priest after the order of the covenant which God made 
with Enoch. 

It being after the order of the Son of God; which order came, 
not by man, nor the will of man; neither by father nor mother; 
neither by beginning of days nor end of years; but of God; 



94 THE FAITH OF MELCHIZEDEK 

And it was delivered unto men by the calling of his own 
voice, according to his will, unto as many as believed on his name. 

For God having sworn unto Enoch and unto his seed with 
an oath by himself; that every one being ordained after this order 
and calling should dry up waters, to turn them out of their course; 

To put at defiance the armies of nations, to divide the 
earth; to break every hand, to stand in the presence of God; to 
do all things according to his will, according to his command, 
subdue principalities and powers; and this by the will of the Son 
of God which was from before the foundation of the world. 

And men having this faith, coming up unto this order of 
God, were translated and taken up into heaven. 

And now Melchizedek was a priest of this order; therefore 
he obtained peace in Salem, and was called the prince of peace. 

And his people wrought righteousness, and obtained heaven, 
and sought for the city of Enoch which God had before taken, 
separating it from the earth, having reserved it unto the latter 
days, or the end of the world; 

And hath said, and sworn with an oath, that the heavens 
and the earth should come together; and the sons of God should 
be tried so as by fire. 

Genesis 14:26-35. 



FROM "MELCHIZEDEK" 
By ARIEL L. CROWLEY, LL. B. 

CONDENSED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WORKS 
CITED AND SOURCES OF QUOTATIONS 

ADAM AND MELCHIZEDEK: Vol. 1, Ency. of Freemasonry 

(Rev. Ed.) Hawkins & Hugha, p. 15. 
ALFORD: New Testament for English Readers (1862) on Heb. 

7:1-3. 
AMERICAN ENCYCLOPEDIA: Vol. 18, p. 603. 
AMERICAN STANDARD VERSION: See Heb. 7:1-13. 
ANONYMOUS: Five Books vs. Marcion: Book 4, Lines 87-106. 
APOCRYPHAL WORKS: "Acts of the Holy Apostles" on Psalms 

110:4. 
ATHANASIUS: See "Melchizedek" in Baring-Gould's "Legends 

of the Prophets and Patriarchs." 
BARING-GOULD, S,: See "Melchizedek" in his "Legends of the 

Prephets and Patriarchs." 



"MELCHIZEDEK" 95 

SYRJAC VERSION: See Heb. 7:1-13 in Murdock's Translation 

of the Peshitto. 
TERTULLIAN: "Answer to the Jews," Chapters 2 and 3; Also 

Marcion Bk. 5, Ch. 9; and Adv. Haer. Ch. 8. 
TESTAMENTS OF THE TWELVE PATRIARCHS: Testament 

of Levi, Chapter 8 on "New Priesthood." 
THEOPHILUS OF ANTIOCH: Epistle to Autolycus, Chapter 31. 
THEODOTUS: Fragment preserved in Tertullian Adv. Haer. 

Chapter 8. 
TIMOTHEUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE: De Receptione Haeret- 

icorum (Cotelier, Monumento Ecc. Graeca, Book III, p. 392. 

(See also Pseudo-Tertullian, Praescript. LIH; Theodoret, 

Haer.; and Frabricius 11:6). 
TRACT BAVA BATHRA: On Psalm 110, Melchizedek as its 

author. 
TREGELLES: See translation of Heb. 7:1-13 in New Testament, 

1852-1872. 
TWENTIETH CENTURY NEW TESTAMENT: See Heb. 7. 
WESCOTT: See his "Epistle to the Hebrews" in Greek with 

English Commentary, p. 171. 
WILSON: See his "Emphatic Diaglott" of Heb. 7. 
WYCLIFFE: N. T., version of 1380 (See Purvey's Revision of 

1388, on Heb 7. 
BERESHITH-RABBA: Section 43, folio 42, "The justifier of 
those who dwell in him." 

BERRY: Interlinear Greek-English New Testament on Heb. 7:1-13. 
BOOK OF THE COMBAT OF ADAM: See Canaan therein as 
father of Melchizedek. 
CATENA ARABIC A: See on Genesis 1. Melchizedek as son of 

Heraclis the son of Peleg. 
CHRONICON PASCHALE: See page 49, 1688 edition of C. 
du Fresne du Cange, Paris. 
CATHOLIC MASSES: See X Cath. Ency. pp. 8, 157, and Vol. 

Ill, p. 264. 
CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA: Bk. II, Misc., Ch. 5. 
COMMENTARIES ON MELCHIZEDEK IN THE OLD TEST- 
AMENT: 

Baumgarten: Old Testament Commentary on Psalm 110, 
p. 182. 

Bahr: "Symbolik 1:179 



96 "MELCHIZEDEK" 

Delitzsch: See Lange, Crit. Doc & Horn. Comm. on Ps. 

110, p. 406 
Lange: Crit. Doc. & Horn. Comm. on Ps. 110, p. 406. 
Murphy: Commentary on Ps. 110, p. 289. 
Mant: 1822 Ed. of Common Prayer Book of Church of 

England, on Ps. 110. 
Clarke: See Commentary on Genesis 14:18 on the meaning 
of "Malki-tsedek." 
i f Smith: William .Robertson, with S. A. Cook: Ency. Brit. Vo. 

18 (11th Ed.) p. 92. 
CYPRIAN: Chapter 4, Epistle to Caecilius No. 62. 
DE ROSSI and KENNICOTT: SEE CLARKE, supra. Collection 

of manuscripts on "al dibrathi." 
DOUAY VERSION OF 1582: See Heb. 7:1-13. 
EISENMENGER: "Neuentdektes Judenthum (Konigsburg, 1711) 

on Midrash traditions. 
EPIPHANIUS: Haer. 55:2, on parentage of Melchizedek. 
FABRICIUS: Codex Pseud. Part V. Vol. 1, p. 311, on Enoch, 

Elias and Melchizedek. 
GEORGIUS CEDRENUS: (Gear's Ed.) Vol. 1, p. 27, Melchiz- 
edek as son of Sidos. 
GESENIUS: Robinson's English-Hebrew Edition of 1844, p. 892 

on "malki-tsedek." 
GOLDEN BOUGH, Frazer.: Vol. 5, p. 17, on Canaanitish origin of 

HASTINGS: "Melchizedek" in his Dictionary of Christ and the 
Gospels, on Heb. 7. 

HIPPOLYTUS: Refutation of All Heresies, Book 7, Ch. 24, and 
Book 10, Ch. 20. 

IGNATIUS: Ch. IV, Epistle to the Philadelphians, on priesthoods. 

INSTITUTES OF LACTANTIUS: Book IV. Ch. 14, p. 214 (Ed- 
inburgh Ed. Ante-Nicene Fathers). 

JEROME: 73rd Epistle, identifying^elchizedek with the Holy 
Ghost. 

JOSEPHUS BEN GORIOM: Book 6, Chapter 35 on identity of 

Jehoram fajtict ^elihizedek. 
-JOSEPHUS: Antiquities of the Jews, Book 1, Ch. 10, Sec. 2. 

JUSTIN MARTYR: Dialogue with Trypho, Chapter 63, and 
also 118. 

JAMES VERSION: AV of Heb. 7:1-13. 






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